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Seasonal abundance of biting midges, Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), collected at cowsheds in the southern part of the Republic of Korea.

Kim HC, Bellis GA, Kim MS, Chong ST, Lee DK, Park JY, Yeh JY, Klein TA - Korean J. Parasitol. (2012)

Bottom Line: The most commonly collected species was Culicoides punctatus (73.0%) followed by C. arakawae (25.7%), while the remaining 7 species accounted for <1.0% of all Culicoides spp. collected.Peak TIs were observed for C. punctatus (1,188.7) and C. arakawae (539.0) during July and August, respectively.C. punctatus and C. arakawae have been implicated in the transmission of arboviruses and other pathogens of veterinary importance that adversely impact on animal and bird husbandry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 5th Medical Detachment, 168th Multifunctional Medical Battalion, 65th Medical Brigade, Unit 15247, APO AP 96205-5247, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Black light traps were used to measure the seasonal and geographical distribution of Culicoides spp. (biting midges or no-see-ums) at 9 cowsheds in the southern half of the Republic of Korea (ROK) from June through October 2010. A total of 25,242 Culicoides females (24,852; 98.5%) and males (390; 1.5%) comprising of 9 species were collected. The most commonly collected species was Culicoides punctatus (73.0%) followed by C. arakawae (25.7%), while the remaining 7 species accounted for <1.0% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The mean number of Culicoides spp. collected per trap night (Trap Index [TI]) was highest for C. punctatus (409.3), followed by C. arakawae (144.2), C. tainanus (4.1), C. oxystoma (1.2), C. circumscriptus (0.7), C. homotomus (0.6), C. erairai (0.4), C. kibunensis (0.3), and C. nipponensis (0.04). Peak TIs were observed for C. punctatus (1,188.7) and C. arakawae (539.0) during July and August, respectively. C. punctatus and C. arakawae have been implicated in the transmission of arboviruses and other pathogens of veterinary importance that adversely impact on animal and bird husbandry.

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Surveyed areas and relative proportion of Culicoides spp. collected by black light traps in each collection site, Republic of Korea, 2010.
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Figure 1: Surveyed areas and relative proportion of Culicoides spp. collected by black light traps in each collection site, Republic of Korea, 2010.

Mentions: Black light traps (model 'Black Hole' by BioTrap, http://www.bio-trap.com), equipped with fine mesh screen nets and two 4-watt black light bulbs as the attractant and dependent upon local electrical sources, were used for surveillance of Culicoides spp. at 9 cowsheds distributed throughout Jeongeup (126° 50' 50.60" E, 35° 06' 26.88" N) in Jeollabuk-do (Province), Damyang (126° 59' 13.94" E, 35° 20' 25.45" N) and Gurye (127° 27' 20.74" E, 35° 12' 10.80" N) in Jeollanam-do, Yeongcheon (128° 52' 18.95" E, 36° 10' 30.94" N) and Gunwi (128° 44' 08.37" E, 36° 09' 58.56" N) in Gyeongsangbuk-do, Jinju (128° 06' 02.28" E, 35° 06' 26.88" N), Changnyeong (128° 26' 33.57" E, 35° 31' 17.67" N) and Yangsan (129° 02' 53.12" E, 35° 25' 11.95" N) in Gyeongsangnam-do, and Ulju (129° 10' 22.72" E, 35° 39' 21.11" N) in Ulsan Metropolitan City in the southern part of the ROK (Fig. 1). Black light traps were placed 1.5 m above the ground and operated for one night each month (June-October) from 06:00 p.m. to 08:00 a.m. the following day at each of the 9 cowsheds. Specimens were collected the following morning after each trap night, trap contents transported on dry ice to the 5th MED DET, and Culicoides spp. separated and identified using the keys of Arnaud [18] and the checklist of Cho and Chong [21]. Voucher specimens are lodged in the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service Northern Territory (AQISNT) collection, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.


Seasonal abundance of biting midges, Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), collected at cowsheds in the southern part of the Republic of Korea.

Kim HC, Bellis GA, Kim MS, Chong ST, Lee DK, Park JY, Yeh JY, Klein TA - Korean J. Parasitol. (2012)

Surveyed areas and relative proportion of Culicoides spp. collected by black light traps in each collection site, Republic of Korea, 2010.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375450&req=5

Figure 1: Surveyed areas and relative proportion of Culicoides spp. collected by black light traps in each collection site, Republic of Korea, 2010.
Mentions: Black light traps (model 'Black Hole' by BioTrap, http://www.bio-trap.com), equipped with fine mesh screen nets and two 4-watt black light bulbs as the attractant and dependent upon local electrical sources, were used for surveillance of Culicoides spp. at 9 cowsheds distributed throughout Jeongeup (126° 50' 50.60" E, 35° 06' 26.88" N) in Jeollabuk-do (Province), Damyang (126° 59' 13.94" E, 35° 20' 25.45" N) and Gurye (127° 27' 20.74" E, 35° 12' 10.80" N) in Jeollanam-do, Yeongcheon (128° 52' 18.95" E, 36° 10' 30.94" N) and Gunwi (128° 44' 08.37" E, 36° 09' 58.56" N) in Gyeongsangbuk-do, Jinju (128° 06' 02.28" E, 35° 06' 26.88" N), Changnyeong (128° 26' 33.57" E, 35° 31' 17.67" N) and Yangsan (129° 02' 53.12" E, 35° 25' 11.95" N) in Gyeongsangnam-do, and Ulju (129° 10' 22.72" E, 35° 39' 21.11" N) in Ulsan Metropolitan City in the southern part of the ROK (Fig. 1). Black light traps were placed 1.5 m above the ground and operated for one night each month (June-October) from 06:00 p.m. to 08:00 a.m. the following day at each of the 9 cowsheds. Specimens were collected the following morning after each trap night, trap contents transported on dry ice to the 5th MED DET, and Culicoides spp. separated and identified using the keys of Arnaud [18] and the checklist of Cho and Chong [21]. Voucher specimens are lodged in the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service Northern Territory (AQISNT) collection, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.

Bottom Line: The most commonly collected species was Culicoides punctatus (73.0%) followed by C. arakawae (25.7%), while the remaining 7 species accounted for <1.0% of all Culicoides spp. collected.Peak TIs were observed for C. punctatus (1,188.7) and C. arakawae (539.0) during July and August, respectively.C. punctatus and C. arakawae have been implicated in the transmission of arboviruses and other pathogens of veterinary importance that adversely impact on animal and bird husbandry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 5th Medical Detachment, 168th Multifunctional Medical Battalion, 65th Medical Brigade, Unit 15247, APO AP 96205-5247, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Black light traps were used to measure the seasonal and geographical distribution of Culicoides spp. (biting midges or no-see-ums) at 9 cowsheds in the southern half of the Republic of Korea (ROK) from June through October 2010. A total of 25,242 Culicoides females (24,852; 98.5%) and males (390; 1.5%) comprising of 9 species were collected. The most commonly collected species was Culicoides punctatus (73.0%) followed by C. arakawae (25.7%), while the remaining 7 species accounted for <1.0% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The mean number of Culicoides spp. collected per trap night (Trap Index [TI]) was highest for C. punctatus (409.3), followed by C. arakawae (144.2), C. tainanus (4.1), C. oxystoma (1.2), C. circumscriptus (0.7), C. homotomus (0.6), C. erairai (0.4), C. kibunensis (0.3), and C. nipponensis (0.04). Peak TIs were observed for C. punctatus (1,188.7) and C. arakawae (539.0) during July and August, respectively. C. punctatus and C. arakawae have been implicated in the transmission of arboviruses and other pathogens of veterinary importance that adversely impact on animal and bird husbandry.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus