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Positivity and intensity of Gnathostoma spinigerum infective larvae in farmed and wild-caught swamp eels in Thailand.

Saksirisampant W, Thanomsub BW - Korean J. Parasitol. (2012)

Bottom Line: The prevalence was high during the rainy and winter seasons.The infection rate abruptly decreased in the beginning of summer.This is the first observation that farmed eels showed positive findings of G. spinigerum infective larvae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Sukhumvit 23 Road, Wattana, Bangkok 10110, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
From July 2008 to June 2009, livers of the swamp eels (Monopterus alba) were investigated for advanced third-stage larvae (AL3) of Gnathostoma spinigerum. Results revealed that 10.2% (106/1,037) and 20.4% (78/383) of farmed eels from Aranyaprathet District, Sa Kaeo Province and those of wild-caught eels obtained from a market in Min Buri District of Bangkok, Thailand were infected, respectively. The prevalence was high during the rainy and winter seasons. The infection rate abruptly decreased in the beginning of summer. The highest infection rate (13.7%) was observed in September and absence of infection (0%) in March-April in the farmed eels. Whereas, in the wild-caught eels, the highest rate (30.7%) was observed in November, and the rate decreased to the lowest at 6.3% in March. The average no. (mean±SE) of AL3 per investigated liver in farmed eels (1.1±0.2) was significantly lower (P=0.040) than those in the caught eels (0.2±0.03). In addition, the intensity of AL3 recovered from each infected liver varied from 1 to 18 (2.3±0.3) in the farmed eels and from 1 to 47 (6.3±1.2) in the caught eels, respectively. The AL3 intensity showed significant difference (P=0.011) between these 2 different sources of eels. This is the first observation that farmed eels showed positive findings of G. spinigerum infective larvae. This may affect the standard farming of the culture farm and also present a risk of consuming undercooked eels from the wild-caught and farmed eels.

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Image of the advanced third stage larva of Gnathostoma spinigerum harvested from the investigated eel's liver. (A) Whole larva. (B) Close up of the head bulb.
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Figure 2: Image of the advanced third stage larva of Gnathostoma spinigerum harvested from the investigated eel's liver. (A) Whole larva. (B) Close up of the head bulb.

Mentions: Among 1,420 investigated eels' livers from 2 different sources, a total of 674 larvae were harvested. According to the source of eels, 10.2% (106/1,037) and 20.4% (78/383) of the eels from a farm in the district of Aranyaprathet, Sa Kaeo Province (APSK) and those from wild-caught eels of Min Buri District, Bangkok (MBBK) were infected, respectively (Fig. 1). On the criteria of morphology and number of cephalic hooklet rows on the head bulb, all Gnathostoma AL3 harvested were G. spinigerum (Fig. 2).


Positivity and intensity of Gnathostoma spinigerum infective larvae in farmed and wild-caught swamp eels in Thailand.

Saksirisampant W, Thanomsub BW - Korean J. Parasitol. (2012)

Image of the advanced third stage larva of Gnathostoma spinigerum harvested from the investigated eel's liver. (A) Whole larva. (B) Close up of the head bulb.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375448&req=5

Figure 2: Image of the advanced third stage larva of Gnathostoma spinigerum harvested from the investigated eel's liver. (A) Whole larva. (B) Close up of the head bulb.
Mentions: Among 1,420 investigated eels' livers from 2 different sources, a total of 674 larvae were harvested. According to the source of eels, 10.2% (106/1,037) and 20.4% (78/383) of the eels from a farm in the district of Aranyaprathet, Sa Kaeo Province (APSK) and those from wild-caught eels of Min Buri District, Bangkok (MBBK) were infected, respectively (Fig. 1). On the criteria of morphology and number of cephalic hooklet rows on the head bulb, all Gnathostoma AL3 harvested were G. spinigerum (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The prevalence was high during the rainy and winter seasons.The infection rate abruptly decreased in the beginning of summer.This is the first observation that farmed eels showed positive findings of G. spinigerum infective larvae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Sukhumvit 23 Road, Wattana, Bangkok 10110, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
From July 2008 to June 2009, livers of the swamp eels (Monopterus alba) were investigated for advanced third-stage larvae (AL3) of Gnathostoma spinigerum. Results revealed that 10.2% (106/1,037) and 20.4% (78/383) of farmed eels from Aranyaprathet District, Sa Kaeo Province and those of wild-caught eels obtained from a market in Min Buri District of Bangkok, Thailand were infected, respectively. The prevalence was high during the rainy and winter seasons. The infection rate abruptly decreased in the beginning of summer. The highest infection rate (13.7%) was observed in September and absence of infection (0%) in March-April in the farmed eels. Whereas, in the wild-caught eels, the highest rate (30.7%) was observed in November, and the rate decreased to the lowest at 6.3% in March. The average no. (mean±SE) of AL3 per investigated liver in farmed eels (1.1±0.2) was significantly lower (P=0.040) than those in the caught eels (0.2±0.03). In addition, the intensity of AL3 recovered from each infected liver varied from 1 to 18 (2.3±0.3) in the farmed eels and from 1 to 47 (6.3±1.2) in the caught eels, respectively. The AL3 intensity showed significant difference (P=0.011) between these 2 different sources of eels. This is the first observation that farmed eels showed positive findings of G. spinigerum infective larvae. This may affect the standard farming of the culture farm and also present a risk of consuming undercooked eels from the wild-caught and farmed eels.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus