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Non-Coding RNAs Regulating Morphine Function: With Emphasis on the In vivo and In vitro Functions of miR-190.

Zheng H, Law PY, Loh HH - Front Genet (2012)

Bottom Line: Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), especially microRNAs, are reported to be involved in a variety of biological processes, including several processes related to drug addiction.Using miR-23b as an example, we present the possible ways in which ncRNA-mediated regulation of OPRM1 expression could impact opioid addiction.After discussing the possible targets of ncRNAs involved in the development of opioid addiction, we summarize the mechanisms underlying the interaction between ncRNAs and opioid addiction and present suggestions for further study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Regenerative Biology, South China Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), especially microRNAs, are reported to be involved in a variety of biological processes, including several processes related to drug addiction. It has been suggested that the biological functions of opioids, one typical type of addictive drugs, are regulated by ncRNAs. In the current review, we examine a variety of mechanisms through which ncRNAs could regulate μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) activities and thereby contribute to the development of opioid addiction. Using miR-23b as an example, we present the possible ways in which ncRNA-mediated regulation of OPRM1 expression could impact opioid addiction. Using miR-190 as an example, we demonstrate the critical roles played by ncRNAs in the signal cascade from receptor to systemic responses, including the possible modulation of adult neurogenesis and in vivo contextual memory. After discussing the possible targets of ncRNAs involved in the development of opioid addiction, we summarize the mechanisms underlying the interaction between ncRNAs and opioid addiction and present suggestions for further study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The possible mechanisms through which ncRNAs contribute to opioid addiction. The binding of an opioid to OPRM1 leads to various biological responses, some of which ultimately lead to addiction. The ncRNAs involved in opioid addiction can be classified into two categories: (1) ncRNAs whose expression are regulated by opioids and mediate one or several biological responses that lead to addiction; and (2) ncRNAs whose expression are not regulated by opioids, but support the cascade from receptor to biological responses and then to addiction.
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Figure 2: The possible mechanisms through which ncRNAs contribute to opioid addiction. The binding of an opioid to OPRM1 leads to various biological responses, some of which ultimately lead to addiction. The ncRNAs involved in opioid addiction can be classified into two categories: (1) ncRNAs whose expression are regulated by opioids and mediate one or several biological responses that lead to addiction; and (2) ncRNAs whose expression are not regulated by opioids, but support the cascade from receptor to biological responses and then to addiction.

Mentions: To further explore the possible mechanisms through which ncRNAs contribute to opioid addiction, a simplified schematic illustration is provided in Figure 2. The binding of an opioid to OPRM1 leads to various biological responses, some of which ultimately lead to addiction. The ncRNAs involved in opioid addiction can be classified into two categories: (1) ncRNAs whose expression are regulated by opioids and mediate one or several biological responses that lead to addiction, and (2) ncRNAs whose expression are not regulated by opioids, but support the cascade from receptor to biological responses and then to addiction. The ncRNAs listed in Table 1 should belong to the first category if their contribution to opioid addiction is confirmed in future investigations, since not all ncRNAs regulated by opioids contribute to the development of addiction. The number of ncRNAs in the second category can be larger than those in the first, since the development of opioid addiction requires a large number of biological steps. Unfortunately, reports on these ncRNAs are limited, possibly because they are not regulated by opioids and thus have relatively lower significance in this field.


Non-Coding RNAs Regulating Morphine Function: With Emphasis on the In vivo and In vitro Functions of miR-190.

Zheng H, Law PY, Loh HH - Front Genet (2012)

The possible mechanisms through which ncRNAs contribute to opioid addiction. The binding of an opioid to OPRM1 leads to various biological responses, some of which ultimately lead to addiction. The ncRNAs involved in opioid addiction can be classified into two categories: (1) ncRNAs whose expression are regulated by opioids and mediate one or several biological responses that lead to addiction; and (2) ncRNAs whose expression are not regulated by opioids, but support the cascade from receptor to biological responses and then to addiction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375446&req=5

Figure 2: The possible mechanisms through which ncRNAs contribute to opioid addiction. The binding of an opioid to OPRM1 leads to various biological responses, some of which ultimately lead to addiction. The ncRNAs involved in opioid addiction can be classified into two categories: (1) ncRNAs whose expression are regulated by opioids and mediate one or several biological responses that lead to addiction; and (2) ncRNAs whose expression are not regulated by opioids, but support the cascade from receptor to biological responses and then to addiction.
Mentions: To further explore the possible mechanisms through which ncRNAs contribute to opioid addiction, a simplified schematic illustration is provided in Figure 2. The binding of an opioid to OPRM1 leads to various biological responses, some of which ultimately lead to addiction. The ncRNAs involved in opioid addiction can be classified into two categories: (1) ncRNAs whose expression are regulated by opioids and mediate one or several biological responses that lead to addiction, and (2) ncRNAs whose expression are not regulated by opioids, but support the cascade from receptor to biological responses and then to addiction. The ncRNAs listed in Table 1 should belong to the first category if their contribution to opioid addiction is confirmed in future investigations, since not all ncRNAs regulated by opioids contribute to the development of addiction. The number of ncRNAs in the second category can be larger than those in the first, since the development of opioid addiction requires a large number of biological steps. Unfortunately, reports on these ncRNAs are limited, possibly because they are not regulated by opioids and thus have relatively lower significance in this field.

Bottom Line: Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), especially microRNAs, are reported to be involved in a variety of biological processes, including several processes related to drug addiction.Using miR-23b as an example, we present the possible ways in which ncRNA-mediated regulation of OPRM1 expression could impact opioid addiction.After discussing the possible targets of ncRNAs involved in the development of opioid addiction, we summarize the mechanisms underlying the interaction between ncRNAs and opioid addiction and present suggestions for further study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Regenerative Biology, South China Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), especially microRNAs, are reported to be involved in a variety of biological processes, including several processes related to drug addiction. It has been suggested that the biological functions of opioids, one typical type of addictive drugs, are regulated by ncRNAs. In the current review, we examine a variety of mechanisms through which ncRNAs could regulate μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) activities and thereby contribute to the development of opioid addiction. Using miR-23b as an example, we present the possible ways in which ncRNA-mediated regulation of OPRM1 expression could impact opioid addiction. Using miR-190 as an example, we demonstrate the critical roles played by ncRNAs in the signal cascade from receptor to systemic responses, including the possible modulation of adult neurogenesis and in vivo contextual memory. After discussing the possible targets of ncRNAs involved in the development of opioid addiction, we summarize the mechanisms underlying the interaction between ncRNAs and opioid addiction and present suggestions for further study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus