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In vitro regeneration of wild chervil (Anthriscus sylvestris L.).

Hendrawati O, Hille J, Woerdenbag HJ, Quax WJ, Kayser O - In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol., Plant (2011)

Bottom Line: Regenerated plants transferred to soil and acclimatized in a greenhouse.Plants were transferred to the field with a 100% survival rate.Regenerated plants flowered and were fully fertile.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Anthriscus sylvestris (L.) Hoffm. (Apiaceae) is a common wild plant that accumulates the lignan deoxypodophyllotoxin. Deoxypodophyllotoxin can be hydroxylated at the C-7 position in recombinant organisms yielding podophyllotoxin, which is used as a semi-synthetic precursor for the anticancer drugs, etoposide phosphate and teniposide. As in vitro regeneration of A. sylvestris has not yet been reported, development of a regeneration protocol for A. sylvestris would be useful as a micropropagation tool and for metabolic engineering of the plant. Calli were induced from hypocotyl explants and transferred to shoot induction medium containing zeatin riboside. Regenerated shoots were obtained within 6 mo and were transferred onto growth regulator-free root induction medium containing 1% sucrose. Regenerated plants transferred to soil and acclimatized in a greenhouse. Plants were transferred to the field with a 100% survival rate. Regenerated plants flowered and were fully fertile. This is the first report of complete regeneration of A. sylvestris via shoot organogenesis from callus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowering of A. sylvestris. (a) Wild type. (b) Wild type (no flower at the bottom part). (c–d) Reduced apical dominance flowering in the branches of the regenerated plants. (e–f) Flowering in the bottom part of the regenerated plants. Arrows show the differences. Bars equal to 10 cm (a–b) and 1 cm (c–f).
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Fig2: Flowering of A. sylvestris. (a) Wild type. (b) Wild type (no flower at the bottom part). (c–d) Reduced apical dominance flowering in the branches of the regenerated plants. (e–f) Flowering in the bottom part of the regenerated plants. Arrows show the differences. Bars equal to 10 cm (a–b) and 1 cm (c–f).

Mentions: After 2–4 mo in the field, 55% of the regenerated plants (11 out of 20) flowered (Fig. 1l), formed seed pods (Fig. 1m) and eventually shed seeds. The phenotype of the regenerated plants was similar to wild type except for the flowers, which showed a reduced apical dominance (Fig. 2). The regenerated plants flowered in the branches and at the basal part (Fig. 2c–f), whereas wild-type plants flower in the apical part (Fig. 2a–b). Seeds (R1) from the regenerated plants were collected, dried, and placed at 1°C for germination. After a 2–3 mo period of cold stratification, seeds from four regenerated plants germinated. Twenty regenerated seedlings (R1) of each regenerated plant (R0) were grown in the greenhouse.Figure 2.


In vitro regeneration of wild chervil (Anthriscus sylvestris L.).

Hendrawati O, Hille J, Woerdenbag HJ, Quax WJ, Kayser O - In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol., Plant (2011)

Flowering of A. sylvestris. (a) Wild type. (b) Wild type (no flower at the bottom part). (c–d) Reduced apical dominance flowering in the branches of the regenerated plants. (e–f) Flowering in the bottom part of the regenerated plants. Arrows show the differences. Bars equal to 10 cm (a–b) and 1 cm (c–f).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig2: Flowering of A. sylvestris. (a) Wild type. (b) Wild type (no flower at the bottom part). (c–d) Reduced apical dominance flowering in the branches of the regenerated plants. (e–f) Flowering in the bottom part of the regenerated plants. Arrows show the differences. Bars equal to 10 cm (a–b) and 1 cm (c–f).
Mentions: After 2–4 mo in the field, 55% of the regenerated plants (11 out of 20) flowered (Fig. 1l), formed seed pods (Fig. 1m) and eventually shed seeds. The phenotype of the regenerated plants was similar to wild type except for the flowers, which showed a reduced apical dominance (Fig. 2). The regenerated plants flowered in the branches and at the basal part (Fig. 2c–f), whereas wild-type plants flower in the apical part (Fig. 2a–b). Seeds (R1) from the regenerated plants were collected, dried, and placed at 1°C for germination. After a 2–3 mo period of cold stratification, seeds from four regenerated plants germinated. Twenty regenerated seedlings (R1) of each regenerated plant (R0) were grown in the greenhouse.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Regenerated plants transferred to soil and acclimatized in a greenhouse.Plants were transferred to the field with a 100% survival rate.Regenerated plants flowered and were fully fertile.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Anthriscus sylvestris (L.) Hoffm. (Apiaceae) is a common wild plant that accumulates the lignan deoxypodophyllotoxin. Deoxypodophyllotoxin can be hydroxylated at the C-7 position in recombinant organisms yielding podophyllotoxin, which is used as a semi-synthetic precursor for the anticancer drugs, etoposide phosphate and teniposide. As in vitro regeneration of A. sylvestris has not yet been reported, development of a regeneration protocol for A. sylvestris would be useful as a micropropagation tool and for metabolic engineering of the plant. Calli were induced from hypocotyl explants and transferred to shoot induction medium containing zeatin riboside. Regenerated shoots were obtained within 6 mo and were transferred onto growth regulator-free root induction medium containing 1% sucrose. Regenerated plants transferred to soil and acclimatized in a greenhouse. Plants were transferred to the field with a 100% survival rate. Regenerated plants flowered and were fully fertile. This is the first report of complete regeneration of A. sylvestris via shoot organogenesis from callus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus