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Hematological- and Neurological-Expressed Sequence 1 Gene Products in Progenitor Cells during Newt Retinal Development.

Goto T, Tokunaga F, Hisatomi O - Stem Cells Int (2012)

Bottom Line: We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration.We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal.Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-1, Toyonaka 560-0043, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Urodele amphibians such as Japanese common newts have a remarkable ability to regenerate their injured neural retina, even as adults. We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration. In this study, we investigated the distribution of the HN1 protein, the product of the Hn1 gene, in the developing retinas. Our immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the HN1 protein was highly expressed in an immature retina, and the subcellular localization changed during this retinogenesis as observed in newt retinal regeneration. We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal. Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

No MeSH data available.


Double staining experiment of a developing retina at stage 28 (a–c) and stage 42 (d–f). Cell nuclei (a and d), the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein (b and e), and the composite image (c and f). All scale bars indicate 50 μm.
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fig2: Double staining experiment of a developing retina at stage 28 (a–c) and stage 42 (d–f). Cell nuclei (a and d), the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein (b and e), and the composite image (c and f). All scale bars indicate 50 μm.

Mentions: Then, we examined detail of the HN1 protein in the developing newt retina by double-staining experiments (Figure 2). The immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was overlapped with the cell nuclei in immature retinas at the developmental stage 28 (Figures 2(a)–2(c)). While the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was not observed in the cell nuclei at the later developmental stage 42 (Figures 2(d)–2(f)). These results were consistent with our previous study on the regenerating newt retina [16], indicating that the HN1 protein plays similar roles during development and regeneration of newt neural retinas.


Hematological- and Neurological-Expressed Sequence 1 Gene Products in Progenitor Cells during Newt Retinal Development.

Goto T, Tokunaga F, Hisatomi O - Stem Cells Int (2012)

Double staining experiment of a developing retina at stage 28 (a–c) and stage 42 (d–f). Cell nuclei (a and d), the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein (b and e), and the composite image (c and f). All scale bars indicate 50 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375142&req=5

fig2: Double staining experiment of a developing retina at stage 28 (a–c) and stage 42 (d–f). Cell nuclei (a and d), the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein (b and e), and the composite image (c and f). All scale bars indicate 50 μm.
Mentions: Then, we examined detail of the HN1 protein in the developing newt retina by double-staining experiments (Figure 2). The immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was overlapped with the cell nuclei in immature retinas at the developmental stage 28 (Figures 2(a)–2(c)). While the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was not observed in the cell nuclei at the later developmental stage 42 (Figures 2(d)–2(f)). These results were consistent with our previous study on the regenerating newt retina [16], indicating that the HN1 protein plays similar roles during development and regeneration of newt neural retinas.

Bottom Line: We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration.We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal.Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-1, Toyonaka 560-0043, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Urodele amphibians such as Japanese common newts have a remarkable ability to regenerate their injured neural retina, even as adults. We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration. In this study, we investigated the distribution of the HN1 protein, the product of the Hn1 gene, in the developing retinas. Our immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the HN1 protein was highly expressed in an immature retina, and the subcellular localization changed during this retinogenesis as observed in newt retinal regeneration. We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal. Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

No MeSH data available.