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Hematological- and Neurological-Expressed Sequence 1 Gene Products in Progenitor Cells during Newt Retinal Development.

Goto T, Tokunaga F, Hisatomi O - Stem Cells Int (2012)

Bottom Line: We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration.We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal.Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-1, Toyonaka 560-0043, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Urodele amphibians such as Japanese common newts have a remarkable ability to regenerate their injured neural retina, even as adults. We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration. In this study, we investigated the distribution of the HN1 protein, the product of the Hn1 gene, in the developing retinas. Our immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the HN1 protein was highly expressed in an immature retina, and the subcellular localization changed during this retinogenesis as observed in newt retinal regeneration. We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal. Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

No MeSH data available.


Immunoreactivities for HN1 protein in newt retinas at early stages of eye development. The developmental stages of embryos were determined as shown in, Materials and Methods. Nomarski images (a, c, e, and g) and immunoreactivity (b, d, f, and h) in transverse sections of stage 28 (a, and b) and stage 32 (c, and d) embryos, and in coronal sections of stage 37 (e, and f) and stage 42 (g, and h) embryos. The fibrillary fluorescent signal was observed, corresponding to the region outside RPE layer from the bright-field observation (arrows in Figures 1(e) and 1(f)). All scale bars indicate 100 μm.
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fig1: Immunoreactivities for HN1 protein in newt retinas at early stages of eye development. The developmental stages of embryos were determined as shown in, Materials and Methods. Nomarski images (a, c, e, and g) and immunoreactivity (b, d, f, and h) in transverse sections of stage 28 (a, and b) and stage 32 (c, and d) embryos, and in coronal sections of stage 37 (e, and f) and stage 42 (g, and h) embryos. The fibrillary fluorescent signal was observed, corresponding to the region outside RPE layer from the bright-field observation (arrows in Figures 1(e) and 1(f)). All scale bars indicate 100 μm.

Mentions: Our previous study showed that the Hn1 gene was induced in the RPE cells at an early stage during newt retinal regeneration [16]. To clarify the distribution of HN1 protein during retinal formation, we performed immunohistochemical analyses for the HN1 protein in newt embryos. At developmental stage 28, optic cups evaginated from a neural tube. The immunoreactivity of our anti-HN1 antiserum was observed not only in whole eyes, but also in presumptive brain and gut (Figures 1(a) and 1(b)). At developmental stage 32, the eyes grew larger and the epidermis contacting the retinas invaginated to form lenses. The immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was still observed in the whole retinas (Figures 1(c) and 1(d)). At developmental stage 37, when a lens and a neural retina consisting of multiple-layered cells were formed, the anti-HN1 antiserum recognized the marginal region of each cell (Figures 1(e) and 1(f)). At developmental stage 42, when plexiform layers and a RPE layer were formed, the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was observed particularly in the plexiform layers (Figures 1(g) and 1(h)). The HN1 immunoreactivities were also found at the medial side in the lateral region (arrowheads in Figures 1(e)–1(h)). The HN1-immunopositive cells may be retinal progenitor cells in ciliarly marginal zone. These data indicated that the HN1 protein was highly expressed in undifferentiated cells during normal retina development.


Hematological- and Neurological-Expressed Sequence 1 Gene Products in Progenitor Cells during Newt Retinal Development.

Goto T, Tokunaga F, Hisatomi O - Stem Cells Int (2012)

Immunoreactivities for HN1 protein in newt retinas at early stages of eye development. The developmental stages of embryos were determined as shown in, Materials and Methods. Nomarski images (a, c, e, and g) and immunoreactivity (b, d, f, and h) in transverse sections of stage 28 (a, and b) and stage 32 (c, and d) embryos, and in coronal sections of stage 37 (e, and f) and stage 42 (g, and h) embryos. The fibrillary fluorescent signal was observed, corresponding to the region outside RPE layer from the bright-field observation (arrows in Figures 1(e) and 1(f)). All scale bars indicate 100 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375142&req=5

fig1: Immunoreactivities for HN1 protein in newt retinas at early stages of eye development. The developmental stages of embryos were determined as shown in, Materials and Methods. Nomarski images (a, c, e, and g) and immunoreactivity (b, d, f, and h) in transverse sections of stage 28 (a, and b) and stage 32 (c, and d) embryos, and in coronal sections of stage 37 (e, and f) and stage 42 (g, and h) embryos. The fibrillary fluorescent signal was observed, corresponding to the region outside RPE layer from the bright-field observation (arrows in Figures 1(e) and 1(f)). All scale bars indicate 100 μm.
Mentions: Our previous study showed that the Hn1 gene was induced in the RPE cells at an early stage during newt retinal regeneration [16]. To clarify the distribution of HN1 protein during retinal formation, we performed immunohistochemical analyses for the HN1 protein in newt embryos. At developmental stage 28, optic cups evaginated from a neural tube. The immunoreactivity of our anti-HN1 antiserum was observed not only in whole eyes, but also in presumptive brain and gut (Figures 1(a) and 1(b)). At developmental stage 32, the eyes grew larger and the epidermis contacting the retinas invaginated to form lenses. The immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was still observed in the whole retinas (Figures 1(c) and 1(d)). At developmental stage 37, when a lens and a neural retina consisting of multiple-layered cells were formed, the anti-HN1 antiserum recognized the marginal region of each cell (Figures 1(e) and 1(f)). At developmental stage 42, when plexiform layers and a RPE layer were formed, the immunoreactivity for the HN1 protein was observed particularly in the plexiform layers (Figures 1(g) and 1(h)). The HN1 immunoreactivities were also found at the medial side in the lateral region (arrowheads in Figures 1(e)–1(h)). The HN1-immunopositive cells may be retinal progenitor cells in ciliarly marginal zone. These data indicated that the HN1 protein was highly expressed in undifferentiated cells during normal retina development.

Bottom Line: We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration.We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal.Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-1, Toyonaka 560-0043, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Urodele amphibians such as Japanese common newts have a remarkable ability to regenerate their injured neural retina, even as adults. We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1) gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration. In this study, we investigated the distribution of the HN1 protein, the product of the Hn1 gene, in the developing retinas. Our immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the HN1 protein was highly expressed in an immature retina, and the subcellular localization changed during this retinogenesis as observed in newt retinal regeneration. We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal. Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

No MeSH data available.