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Speech Recognition Performance under Noisy Conditions of Children with Hearing Loss.

Yang HM, Hsieh YJ, Wu JL - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2012)

Bottom Line: Performance was significantly better in children with CIs (SNR 10: mean, 49.44, standard deviation [SD], 13.90; SNR 0: mean, 31.95, SD, 15.72) than in children with HAs (SNR 10: mean, 33.33, SD, 9.72; SNR 0: mean, 19.52, SD, 6.67; P<0.05) in both noise backgrounds, but no significant interaction was found between devices and background noise level.An interaction was found to between background noise level and contextual cues in sentences (F=8.47, P<0.01).Children with CIs perform better than children with HAs at both noise levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, National Cheng Kung University Medical College, Tainan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In order to understand the communicative abilities of hearing impaired children in noisy situations and their communication problems, this study was undertaken to examine speech recognition at different background noise levels, and to compare how context cues in noisy situations affect speech recognition.

Methods: Thirty-four children with severe/profound hearing impairment were enrolled. Fifteen children had cochlear implants (CIs) and 19 used hearing aids (HAs). The Mandarin Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN) test was performed under two levels of background noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) 10 dB and SNR 0 dB (high and low levels, respectively). High predictive (HP) and low predictive (LP) sentences SPIN test scores were recorded to test the effect of context cues on speech recognition.

Results: Performance was significantly better in children with CIs (SNR 10: mean, 49.44, standard deviation [SD], 13.90; SNR 0: mean, 31.95, SD, 15.72) than in children with HAs (SNR 10: mean, 33.33, SD, 9.72; SNR 0: mean, 19.52, SD, 6.67; P<0.05) in both noise backgrounds, but no significant interaction was found between devices and background noise level. Hearing-impaired children performed better at SNR 10 dB (mean, 40.44; SD, 14.12) than at SNR 0 dB (mean, 25.0; SD, 12.98), significantly (P<0.001). Performance for HP sentences (mean, 38.6; SD, 12.66) was significantly (P<0.001) better than that for LP sentences (mean, 25.25; SD, 12.93). An interaction was found to between background noise level and contextual cues in sentences (F=8.47, P<0.01).

Conclusion: The study shows that SNR conditions significantly influence speech recognition performance in children with severe/profound hearing impairment. Under better SNR listening situations, children have better speech recognition when listening to sentences with contextual cues. Children with CIs perform better than children with HAs at both noise levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN) performance for high predictability (HP) and low predictability (LP) sentences under the two conditions. SNR, signal-to-noise ratio.
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Figure 2: The Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN) performance for high predictability (HP) and low predictability (LP) sentences under the two conditions. SNR, signal-to-noise ratio.

Mentions: Two-way ANOVA (Table 3) showed the main effects, contextual cues and SNR conditions, on speech recognition were significant, and that the interaction between contextual cues and SNR conditions was also significant. The performance of hearing impaired children for HP sentences (mean, 38.6; SD, 12.66) was significantly better than for LP sentences (mean, 25.25; SD, 12.93) (F=115.79, P<0.001), and an interaction was found between noise level and contextual cues in sentences (F=8.47, P<0.01). This meant children's results for HP and LP sentences at SNR 0 dB are more different than at SNR 10 dB (Table 3, Fig. 2), and that speech recognition performance to different levels of contextual cues (HP/LP) is affected by different signal-noise ratios. Furthermore, contextual cues had a smaller effect under SNR 10 than under SNR 0.


Speech Recognition Performance under Noisy Conditions of Children with Hearing Loss.

Yang HM, Hsieh YJ, Wu JL - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2012)

The Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN) performance for high predictability (HP) and low predictability (LP) sentences under the two conditions. SNR, signal-to-noise ratio.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369988&req=5

Figure 2: The Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN) performance for high predictability (HP) and low predictability (LP) sentences under the two conditions. SNR, signal-to-noise ratio.
Mentions: Two-way ANOVA (Table 3) showed the main effects, contextual cues and SNR conditions, on speech recognition were significant, and that the interaction between contextual cues and SNR conditions was also significant. The performance of hearing impaired children for HP sentences (mean, 38.6; SD, 12.66) was significantly better than for LP sentences (mean, 25.25; SD, 12.93) (F=115.79, P<0.001), and an interaction was found between noise level and contextual cues in sentences (F=8.47, P<0.01). This meant children's results for HP and LP sentences at SNR 0 dB are more different than at SNR 10 dB (Table 3, Fig. 2), and that speech recognition performance to different levels of contextual cues (HP/LP) is affected by different signal-noise ratios. Furthermore, contextual cues had a smaller effect under SNR 10 than under SNR 0.

Bottom Line: Performance was significantly better in children with CIs (SNR 10: mean, 49.44, standard deviation [SD], 13.90; SNR 0: mean, 31.95, SD, 15.72) than in children with HAs (SNR 10: mean, 33.33, SD, 9.72; SNR 0: mean, 19.52, SD, 6.67; P<0.05) in both noise backgrounds, but no significant interaction was found between devices and background noise level.An interaction was found to between background noise level and contextual cues in sentences (F=8.47, P<0.01).Children with CIs perform better than children with HAs at both noise levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, National Cheng Kung University Medical College, Tainan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In order to understand the communicative abilities of hearing impaired children in noisy situations and their communication problems, this study was undertaken to examine speech recognition at different background noise levels, and to compare how context cues in noisy situations affect speech recognition.

Methods: Thirty-four children with severe/profound hearing impairment were enrolled. Fifteen children had cochlear implants (CIs) and 19 used hearing aids (HAs). The Mandarin Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN) test was performed under two levels of background noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) 10 dB and SNR 0 dB (high and low levels, respectively). High predictive (HP) and low predictive (LP) sentences SPIN test scores were recorded to test the effect of context cues on speech recognition.

Results: Performance was significantly better in children with CIs (SNR 10: mean, 49.44, standard deviation [SD], 13.90; SNR 0: mean, 31.95, SD, 15.72) than in children with HAs (SNR 10: mean, 33.33, SD, 9.72; SNR 0: mean, 19.52, SD, 6.67; P<0.05) in both noise backgrounds, but no significant interaction was found between devices and background noise level. Hearing-impaired children performed better at SNR 10 dB (mean, 40.44; SD, 14.12) than at SNR 0 dB (mean, 25.0; SD, 12.98), significantly (P<0.001). Performance for HP sentences (mean, 38.6; SD, 12.66) was significantly (P<0.001) better than that for LP sentences (mean, 25.25; SD, 12.93). An interaction was found to between background noise level and contextual cues in sentences (F=8.47, P<0.01).

Conclusion: The study shows that SNR conditions significantly influence speech recognition performance in children with severe/profound hearing impairment. Under better SNR listening situations, children have better speech recognition when listening to sentences with contextual cues. Children with CIs perform better than children with HAs at both noise levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus