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What factors are associated with good performance in children with cochlear implants? From the outcome of various language development tests, research on sensory and communicative disorders project in Japan: nagasaki experience.

Kanda Y, Kumagami H, Hara M, Sainoo Y, Sato C, Yamamoto-Fukuda T, Yoshida H, Ito A, Tanaka C, Baba K, Nakata A, Tanaka H, Fukushima K, Kasai N, Takahashi H - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2012)

Bottom Line: This report discusses findings as well as factors that led to better results in children with severe-profound hearing loss.Overall, the results show that 76.2% of the scores obtained by the children in these tests exceeded the national average scores of children with hearing difficulty.In this study, we suggest that taking the above four factors into consideration will have an affect on the language development of children with severe-profound hearing loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kanda ENT Clinic, Nagasaki Bell Hearing Center, Nagasaki, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We conducted multi-directional language development tests as a part of the Research on Sensory and Communicative Disorders (RSVD) in Japan. This report discusses findings as well as factors that led to better results in children with severe-profound hearing loss.

Methods: We evaluated multiple language development tests in 33 Japanese children with cochlear implants (32 patients) and hearing aid (1 patient), including 1) Test for question and answer interaction development, 2) Word fluency test, 3) Japanese version of the Peabody picture vocabulary test-revised, 4) The standardized comprehension test of abstract words, 5) The screening test of reading and writing for Japanese primary school children, 6) The syntactic processing test of aphasia, 7) Criterion-referenced testing (CRT) for Japanese language and mathematics, 8) Pervasive development disorders ASJ rating scales, and 9) Raven's colored progressive matrices. Furthermore, we investigated the factors believed to account for the better performances in these tests. The first group, group A, consisted of 14 children with higher scores in all tests than the national average for children with hearing difficulty. The second group, group B, included 19 children that scored below the national average in any of the tests.

Results: Overall, the results show that 76.2% of the scores obtained by the children in these tests exceeded the national average scores of children with hearing difficulty. The children who finished above average on all tests had undergone a longer period of regular habilitation in our rehabilitation center, had their implants earlier in life, were exposed to more auditory verbal/oral communication in their education at affiliated institutions, and were more likely to have been integrated in a regular kindergarten before moving on to elementary school.

Conclusion: In this study, we suggest that taking the above four factors into consideration will have an affect on the language development of children with severe-profound hearing loss.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Educational institution child attended before entrance to primary school.
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Figure 12: Educational institution child attended before entrance to primary school.

Mentions: Children in group A attended regular school for 4.4 years, and those in group B attended for 3 years. Auditory verbal/oral education was 8 years for group A and 6.7 years for group B. While group A's education was longer than that of group B, there were no significant differences between the two groups (Fig. 11). Fig. 12 shows the percentage of children who were integrated into regular kindergarten and nursery school before attending elementary school; there were significant differences between groups A and B (P=0.01*).


What factors are associated with good performance in children with cochlear implants? From the outcome of various language development tests, research on sensory and communicative disorders project in Japan: nagasaki experience.

Kanda Y, Kumagami H, Hara M, Sainoo Y, Sato C, Yamamoto-Fukuda T, Yoshida H, Ito A, Tanaka C, Baba K, Nakata A, Tanaka H, Fukushima K, Kasai N, Takahashi H - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2012)

Educational institution child attended before entrance to primary school.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369984&req=5

Figure 12: Educational institution child attended before entrance to primary school.
Mentions: Children in group A attended regular school for 4.4 years, and those in group B attended for 3 years. Auditory verbal/oral education was 8 years for group A and 6.7 years for group B. While group A's education was longer than that of group B, there were no significant differences between the two groups (Fig. 11). Fig. 12 shows the percentage of children who were integrated into regular kindergarten and nursery school before attending elementary school; there were significant differences between groups A and B (P=0.01*).

Bottom Line: This report discusses findings as well as factors that led to better results in children with severe-profound hearing loss.Overall, the results show that 76.2% of the scores obtained by the children in these tests exceeded the national average scores of children with hearing difficulty.In this study, we suggest that taking the above four factors into consideration will have an affect on the language development of children with severe-profound hearing loss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kanda ENT Clinic, Nagasaki Bell Hearing Center, Nagasaki, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We conducted multi-directional language development tests as a part of the Research on Sensory and Communicative Disorders (RSVD) in Japan. This report discusses findings as well as factors that led to better results in children with severe-profound hearing loss.

Methods: We evaluated multiple language development tests in 33 Japanese children with cochlear implants (32 patients) and hearing aid (1 patient), including 1) Test for question and answer interaction development, 2) Word fluency test, 3) Japanese version of the Peabody picture vocabulary test-revised, 4) The standardized comprehension test of abstract words, 5) The screening test of reading and writing for Japanese primary school children, 6) The syntactic processing test of aphasia, 7) Criterion-referenced testing (CRT) for Japanese language and mathematics, 8) Pervasive development disorders ASJ rating scales, and 9) Raven's colored progressive matrices. Furthermore, we investigated the factors believed to account for the better performances in these tests. The first group, group A, consisted of 14 children with higher scores in all tests than the national average for children with hearing difficulty. The second group, group B, included 19 children that scored below the national average in any of the tests.

Results: Overall, the results show that 76.2% of the scores obtained by the children in these tests exceeded the national average scores of children with hearing difficulty. The children who finished above average on all tests had undergone a longer period of regular habilitation in our rehabilitation center, had their implants earlier in life, were exposed to more auditory verbal/oral communication in their education at affiliated institutions, and were more likely to have been integrated in a regular kindergarten before moving on to elementary school.

Conclusion: In this study, we suggest that taking the above four factors into consideration will have an affect on the language development of children with severe-profound hearing loss.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus