Limits...
Changes in the hearing thresholds of infants who failed the newborn hearing screening test and in infants treated in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Kang MY, Jeong SW, Kim LS - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2012)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the hearing thresholds during the first year of life in infants who failed the newborn hearing screening (NHS) test and of infants treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Of the 193 healthy infants who failed the NHS test, 60 infants (31%) had normal hearing acuity, 126 infants (65%) had sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, ABR threshold ≥40 dB) and 7 infants (4%) had auditory neuropathy (AN).Irreversible intervention such as cochlear implantation should be considered with great caution within the first year after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the hearing thresholds during the first year of life in infants who failed the newborn hearing screening (NHS) test and of infants treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Methods: From March 2007 to November 2010, 193 healthy infants who failed the NHS test and 51 infants who were treated in the NICU were referred for evaluation of hearing acuity. Their hearing was evaluated using impedance audiometry, auditory brainstem response (ABR), and otoacoustic emission before 6 months of age, and follow-up hearing tests were administered before 12 months of age. Changes in their hearing thresholds were then analyzed.

Results: Of the 193 healthy infants who failed the NHS test, 60 infants (31%) had normal hearing acuity, 126 infants (65%) had sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, ABR threshold ≥40 dB) and 7 infants (4%) had auditory neuropathy (AN). On the follow-up hearing tests, which were conducted in 65 infants, 6 infants showed a hearing threshold deterioration of more than 20 dB, and 19 infants showed a hearing threshold improvement of more than 20 dB. Of the 51 infants who were treated in the NICU, 38 infants (75%) had normal hearing acuity, 12 infants (24%) had SNHL, and one infant (2%) had AN. In the follow-up hearing tests, which were performed in 13 infants, one infant with normal hearing progressed to severe hearing loss. Five infants who had SNHL showed a hearing threshold improvement of more than 20 dB, and 4 infants recovered to normal hearing.

Conclusion: The hearing thresholds of infants with congenital SNHL can change during the first year of life; therefore, the importance of administration of follow-up hearing tests is emphasized. Irreversible intervention such as cochlear implantation should be considered with great caution within the first year after birth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of initial diagnostic hearing test and follow-up hearing test performed in infants who were treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). SNHL, sensorineural hearing loss; ABR, auditory brainstem response; AN, auditory neuropathy; diff, difference. *Values in parentheses indicate the mean age at the time of hearing test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369979&req=5

Figure 3: Results of initial diagnostic hearing test and follow-up hearing test performed in infants who were treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). SNHL, sensorineural hearing loss; ABR, auditory brainstem response; AN, auditory neuropathy; diff, difference. *Values in parentheses indicate the mean age at the time of hearing test.

Mentions: The mean age of the 51 infants treated in the NICU was also 1.9 months at the time of their initial diagnostic hearing tests (Fig. 3). Thirty-eight infants (75%) showed normal hearing acuity. Twelve infants (24%) had SNHL, 5 with unilateral hearing loss and 7 with bilateral hearing loss. One infant (2%) had AN. The prevalence of SNHL in NICU infants was 25% (13 out of 51 infants). The prevalence of AN within the population of NICU infants was 0.2% (1 out of 51 infants), while that of AN within the population of NICU infants with SNHL was 7.7% (1 out of 13 infants).


Changes in the hearing thresholds of infants who failed the newborn hearing screening test and in infants treated in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Kang MY, Jeong SW, Kim LS - Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol (2012)

Results of initial diagnostic hearing test and follow-up hearing test performed in infants who were treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). SNHL, sensorineural hearing loss; ABR, auditory brainstem response; AN, auditory neuropathy; diff, difference. *Values in parentheses indicate the mean age at the time of hearing test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369979&req=5

Figure 3: Results of initial diagnostic hearing test and follow-up hearing test performed in infants who were treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). SNHL, sensorineural hearing loss; ABR, auditory brainstem response; AN, auditory neuropathy; diff, difference. *Values in parentheses indicate the mean age at the time of hearing test.
Mentions: The mean age of the 51 infants treated in the NICU was also 1.9 months at the time of their initial diagnostic hearing tests (Fig. 3). Thirty-eight infants (75%) showed normal hearing acuity. Twelve infants (24%) had SNHL, 5 with unilateral hearing loss and 7 with bilateral hearing loss. One infant (2%) had AN. The prevalence of SNHL in NICU infants was 25% (13 out of 51 infants). The prevalence of AN within the population of NICU infants was 0.2% (1 out of 51 infants), while that of AN within the population of NICU infants with SNHL was 7.7% (1 out of 13 infants).

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the hearing thresholds during the first year of life in infants who failed the newborn hearing screening (NHS) test and of infants treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Of the 193 healthy infants who failed the NHS test, 60 infants (31%) had normal hearing acuity, 126 infants (65%) had sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, ABR threshold ≥40 dB) and 7 infants (4%) had auditory neuropathy (AN).Irreversible intervention such as cochlear implantation should be considered with great caution within the first year after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the hearing thresholds during the first year of life in infants who failed the newborn hearing screening (NHS) test and of infants treated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Methods: From March 2007 to November 2010, 193 healthy infants who failed the NHS test and 51 infants who were treated in the NICU were referred for evaluation of hearing acuity. Their hearing was evaluated using impedance audiometry, auditory brainstem response (ABR), and otoacoustic emission before 6 months of age, and follow-up hearing tests were administered before 12 months of age. Changes in their hearing thresholds were then analyzed.

Results: Of the 193 healthy infants who failed the NHS test, 60 infants (31%) had normal hearing acuity, 126 infants (65%) had sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, ABR threshold ≥40 dB) and 7 infants (4%) had auditory neuropathy (AN). On the follow-up hearing tests, which were conducted in 65 infants, 6 infants showed a hearing threshold deterioration of more than 20 dB, and 19 infants showed a hearing threshold improvement of more than 20 dB. Of the 51 infants who were treated in the NICU, 38 infants (75%) had normal hearing acuity, 12 infants (24%) had SNHL, and one infant (2%) had AN. In the follow-up hearing tests, which were performed in 13 infants, one infant with normal hearing progressed to severe hearing loss. Five infants who had SNHL showed a hearing threshold improvement of more than 20 dB, and 4 infants recovered to normal hearing.

Conclusion: The hearing thresholds of infants with congenital SNHL can change during the first year of life; therefore, the importance of administration of follow-up hearing tests is emphasized. Irreversible intervention such as cochlear implantation should be considered with great caution within the first year after birth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus