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Fatal delayed coronary artery perforation after coronary stent implantation.

Kim SH, Moon JY, Sung JH, Kim IJ, Lim SW, Cha DH, Cho SY - Korean Circ J (2012)

Bottom Line: Most type I and II perforations are predominately caused by hydrophilic and stiff wires, often presented in the delayed form, and do not require pericardial drainage or surgical interventions.However, we report a type III delayed coronary artery perforation at the site of stent implantation after intervention without any evidence of immediate perforations.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of angiographic documentation and treatment of delayed coronary perforation at the site of stent, presented as a cardiac arrest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Most type I and II perforations are predominately caused by hydrophilic and stiff wires, often presented in the delayed form, and do not require pericardial drainage or surgical interventions. However, we report a type III delayed coronary artery perforation at the site of stent implantation after intervention without any evidence of immediate perforations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of angiographic documentation and treatment of delayed coronary perforation at the site of stent, presented as a cardiac arrest.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Coronary angiogram for pecutaneous coronary intervention for critical stenosis of left. Circumflex artery. A: coronary angiogram showed critical stenosis of left circumflex artery (arrow). B: after stenting, angiogram showed mild residual stenosis in proximal stented lesion and intravascular ultrasound showed incomplete expansions. C: final angiogram showed no residual lesion and final intravascular ultrasound images revealed improved expansion and good apposition of the stent.
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Figure 1: Coronary angiogram for pecutaneous coronary intervention for critical stenosis of left. Circumflex artery. A: coronary angiogram showed critical stenosis of left circumflex artery (arrow). B: after stenting, angiogram showed mild residual stenosis in proximal stented lesion and intravascular ultrasound showed incomplete expansions. C: final angiogram showed no residual lesion and final intravascular ultrasound images revealed improved expansion and good apposition of the stent.

Mentions: A 64 year-old male patient was admitted for chest pain. He had no specific cardiovascular risk factors except for a history of heavy smoking. Coronary angiogram (CAG) showed critical stenosis of the left circumflex artery (Fig. 1A).


Fatal delayed coronary artery perforation after coronary stent implantation.

Kim SH, Moon JY, Sung JH, Kim IJ, Lim SW, Cha DH, Cho SY - Korean Circ J (2012)

Coronary angiogram for pecutaneous coronary intervention for critical stenosis of left. Circumflex artery. A: coronary angiogram showed critical stenosis of left circumflex artery (arrow). B: after stenting, angiogram showed mild residual stenosis in proximal stented lesion and intravascular ultrasound showed incomplete expansions. C: final angiogram showed no residual lesion and final intravascular ultrasound images revealed improved expansion and good apposition of the stent.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369969&req=5

Figure 1: Coronary angiogram for pecutaneous coronary intervention for critical stenosis of left. Circumflex artery. A: coronary angiogram showed critical stenosis of left circumflex artery (arrow). B: after stenting, angiogram showed mild residual stenosis in proximal stented lesion and intravascular ultrasound showed incomplete expansions. C: final angiogram showed no residual lesion and final intravascular ultrasound images revealed improved expansion and good apposition of the stent.
Mentions: A 64 year-old male patient was admitted for chest pain. He had no specific cardiovascular risk factors except for a history of heavy smoking. Coronary angiogram (CAG) showed critical stenosis of the left circumflex artery (Fig. 1A).

Bottom Line: Most type I and II perforations are predominately caused by hydrophilic and stiff wires, often presented in the delayed form, and do not require pericardial drainage or surgical interventions.However, we report a type III delayed coronary artery perforation at the site of stent implantation after intervention without any evidence of immediate perforations.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of angiographic documentation and treatment of delayed coronary perforation at the site of stent, presented as a cardiac arrest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Most type I and II perforations are predominately caused by hydrophilic and stiff wires, often presented in the delayed form, and do not require pericardial drainage or surgical interventions. However, we report a type III delayed coronary artery perforation at the site of stent implantation after intervention without any evidence of immediate perforations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of angiographic documentation and treatment of delayed coronary perforation at the site of stent, presented as a cardiac arrest.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus