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Recurrent syncope triggered by temporal lobe epilepsy: ictal bradycardia syndrome.

Kang DY, Oh IY, Lee SR, Choe WS, Yoon JH, Lee SK, Choi EK, Oh S - Korean Circ J (2012)

Bottom Line: Ictal asystole is potentially lethal, and known to originate from the involvement of limbic autonomic regions.We report the case of a 54-year-old male with recurrent syncope secondary to ictal asystole triggered by temporal lobe epilepsy.This was confirmed by combined Holter and video-electroencephalogram monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ictal asystole is potentially lethal, and known to originate from the involvement of limbic autonomic regions. Appropriate treatment must include an antiepileptic drug and the implantation of a pacemaker. We report the case of a 54-year-old male with recurrent syncope secondary to ictal asystole triggered by temporal lobe epilepsy. This was confirmed by combined Holter and video-electroencephalogram monitoring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Holter recording. Holter recording showed three episodes of a long sinus pause of 40 seconds, followed by junctional escape rhythm, and then sinus tachycardia.
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Figure 2: Holter recording. Holter recording showed three episodes of a long sinus pause of 40 seconds, followed by junctional escape rhythm, and then sinus tachycardia.

Mentions: The first episode of vacant staring developed while he was eating lunch. His head dropped and showed subtle generalized convulsive movements for a few seconds. EEG showed generalized rhythmic theta activity at that event (Fig. 1). A severe sinus bradycardia and asystole started 22 seconds after seizure onset and lasted 40 seconds (Figs. 1 and 2). Three episodes of seizure attack and a long sinus pause developed during 24 hours of EEG and Holter monitoring (Fig. 2).


Recurrent syncope triggered by temporal lobe epilepsy: ictal bradycardia syndrome.

Kang DY, Oh IY, Lee SR, Choe WS, Yoon JH, Lee SK, Choi EK, Oh S - Korean Circ J (2012)

Holter recording. Holter recording showed three episodes of a long sinus pause of 40 seconds, followed by junctional escape rhythm, and then sinus tachycardia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369968&req=5

Figure 2: Holter recording. Holter recording showed three episodes of a long sinus pause of 40 seconds, followed by junctional escape rhythm, and then sinus tachycardia.
Mentions: The first episode of vacant staring developed while he was eating lunch. His head dropped and showed subtle generalized convulsive movements for a few seconds. EEG showed generalized rhythmic theta activity at that event (Fig. 1). A severe sinus bradycardia and asystole started 22 seconds after seizure onset and lasted 40 seconds (Figs. 1 and 2). Three episodes of seizure attack and a long sinus pause developed during 24 hours of EEG and Holter monitoring (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Ictal asystole is potentially lethal, and known to originate from the involvement of limbic autonomic regions.We report the case of a 54-year-old male with recurrent syncope secondary to ictal asystole triggered by temporal lobe epilepsy.This was confirmed by combined Holter and video-electroencephalogram monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ictal asystole is potentially lethal, and known to originate from the involvement of limbic autonomic regions. Appropriate treatment must include an antiepileptic drug and the implantation of a pacemaker. We report the case of a 54-year-old male with recurrent syncope secondary to ictal asystole triggered by temporal lobe epilepsy. This was confirmed by combined Holter and video-electroencephalogram monitoring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus