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Recurrent Deep Vein Thrombosis due to Thrombophilia.

Rahman A, Islam AM, Husnayen S - Korean Circ J (2012)

Bottom Line: Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency.Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia.The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common condition that is often under-diagnosed. Acquired or hereditary defects of coagulation or a combination of these defects may facilitate the development of DVT. Recurrent DVT, a positive family history or unusual presentation may warrant investigation for hereditary thrombophilia. Investigations are best when conducted at least one month after completion of a course of anticoagulant therapy. Most patients are managed with heparin in the acute stage overlapped by warfarin. The case presented here describes a 40-year old man undergoing three episodes of DVT. Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency. Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia. The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Incompletely recanalized left external iliac vein.
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Figure 2: Incompletely recanalized left external iliac vein.

Mentions: Initial heparin therapy was followed by warfarin, which was discontinued after three months. Within two years the patient had DVT in the left lower limb (Figs. 2 and 3). The patient was prescribed an oral anticoagulant that was discontinued after several months.


Recurrent Deep Vein Thrombosis due to Thrombophilia.

Rahman A, Islam AM, Husnayen S - Korean Circ J (2012)

Incompletely recanalized left external iliac vein.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369967&req=5

Figure 2: Incompletely recanalized left external iliac vein.
Mentions: Initial heparin therapy was followed by warfarin, which was discontinued after three months. Within two years the patient had DVT in the left lower limb (Figs. 2 and 3). The patient was prescribed an oral anticoagulant that was discontinued after several months.

Bottom Line: Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency.Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia.The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common condition that is often under-diagnosed. Acquired or hereditary defects of coagulation or a combination of these defects may facilitate the development of DVT. Recurrent DVT, a positive family history or unusual presentation may warrant investigation for hereditary thrombophilia. Investigations are best when conducted at least one month after completion of a course of anticoagulant therapy. Most patients are managed with heparin in the acute stage overlapped by warfarin. The case presented here describes a 40-year old man undergoing three episodes of DVT. Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency. Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia. The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus