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Recurrent Deep Vein Thrombosis due to Thrombophilia.

Rahman A, Islam AM, Husnayen S - Korean Circ J (2012)

Bottom Line: Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency.Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia.The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common condition that is often under-diagnosed. Acquired or hereditary defects of coagulation or a combination of these defects may facilitate the development of DVT. Recurrent DVT, a positive family history or unusual presentation may warrant investigation for hereditary thrombophilia. Investigations are best when conducted at least one month after completion of a course of anticoagulant therapy. Most patients are managed with heparin in the acute stage overlapped by warfarin. The case presented here describes a 40-year old man undergoing three episodes of DVT. Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency. Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia. The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Left popliteal venous thrombosis.
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Figure 1: Left popliteal venous thrombosis.

Mentions: A 40-year-old non-smoker, non-diabetic, normotensive male presented with swelling and aching pain of the left lower limb extending from the left thigh to the ankle over one week. Upon examination, his pulse was 80 beats per minute and his blood pressure was 140/85 mm Hg. The left lower limb with dusky blue discoloration of skin was diffusely swollen, warm, and exquisitely tender to touch. Arterial pulses in the legs were palpable. Three years ago, he developed a similar illness in the right leg, and was diagnosed as a case of DVT (Fig. 1).


Recurrent Deep Vein Thrombosis due to Thrombophilia.

Rahman A, Islam AM, Husnayen S - Korean Circ J (2012)

Left popliteal venous thrombosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369967&req=5

Figure 1: Left popliteal venous thrombosis.
Mentions: A 40-year-old non-smoker, non-diabetic, normotensive male presented with swelling and aching pain of the left lower limb extending from the left thigh to the ankle over one week. Upon examination, his pulse was 80 beats per minute and his blood pressure was 140/85 mm Hg. The left lower limb with dusky blue discoloration of skin was diffusely swollen, warm, and exquisitely tender to touch. Arterial pulses in the legs were palpable. Three years ago, he developed a similar illness in the right leg, and was diagnosed as a case of DVT (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency.Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia.The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common condition that is often under-diagnosed. Acquired or hereditary defects of coagulation or a combination of these defects may facilitate the development of DVT. Recurrent DVT, a positive family history or unusual presentation may warrant investigation for hereditary thrombophilia. Investigations are best when conducted at least one month after completion of a course of anticoagulant therapy. Most patients are managed with heparin in the acute stage overlapped by warfarin. The case presented here describes a 40-year old man undergoing three episodes of DVT. Investigations revealed protein C and protein S deficiency. Protein C, protein S and antithrombin deficiency either singly or in combination, are relatively common causes of hereditary thrombophilia. The case presented here serves as a reminder of the need to look into the underlying cause of venous thromboembolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus