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Field and laboratory studies of the susceptibility of the green treefrog (Hyla cinerea) to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection.

Brannelly LA, Chatfield MW, Richards-Zawacki CL - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Although we were able to infect H. cinerea with Bd in the lab, we did not observe any clinical signs of chytridiomycosis.Furthermore, infection by Bd does not appear to negatively affect body condition or growth rate of post-metamorphic individuals.Our results suggest that H. cinerea is not susceptible to chytridiomycosis post-metamorphosis and probably is not an important carrier of the fungal pathogen Bd in the southeastern United States, although susceptibility at the larval stage remains unknown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States of America. lbrannel@tulane.edu

ABSTRACT
Amphibians worldwide are experiencing devastating declines, some of which are due to the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd). Populations in the southeastern United States, however, have not been noticeably affected by the pathogen. The green treefrog (Hyla cinerea) is abundant and widespread in the southeastern United States, but has not been documented to harbor Bd infection. This study examined the susceptibility of H. cinerea to two strains of Bd in the lab and the prevalence of infection in wild populations of this species in southeastern Louisiana. Although we were able to infect H. cinerea with Bd in the lab, we did not observe any clinical signs of chytridiomycosis. Furthermore, infection by Bd does not appear to negatively affect body condition or growth rate of post-metamorphic individuals. We found no evidence of infection in surveys of wild H. cinerea. Our results suggest that H. cinerea is not susceptible to chytridiomycosis post-metamorphosis and probably is not an important carrier of the fungal pathogen Bd in the southeastern United States, although susceptibility at the larval stage remains unknown.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonal Bd prevalence estimates in Southeastern Louisiana.Monthly Bd prevalence for all H. cinerea (black diamonds) and other amphibian species (open gray circles) species tested across 15 field sites. Error bars are ±95% confidence intervals.
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pone-0038473-g002: Seasonal Bd prevalence estimates in Southeastern Louisiana.Monthly Bd prevalence for all H. cinerea (black diamonds) and other amphibian species (open gray circles) species tested across 15 field sites. Error bars are ±95% confidence intervals.

Mentions: A total of 782 amphibians from 15 sites in southeastern Louisiana were tested for Bd between November 2010 and October 2011 to provide Bd prevalence and seasonality data (Figs. 1 and 2, Table S1). Post-metamorphic Hyla cinerea (juveniles and adults, n = 258) were sampled from 9 of these sites (Table 1). Animals were captured using nitrile-gloved hands, swabbed (with swab MW113, Medical Wire and Equipment Co.), and then released where they were caught. The skin surface of each frog was swabbed 40 times: five times on each of the dorsum, venter and sides, as well as the underside of each foot. Clean gloves were used to handle each animal.


Field and laboratory studies of the susceptibility of the green treefrog (Hyla cinerea) to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection.

Brannelly LA, Chatfield MW, Richards-Zawacki CL - PLoS ONE (2012)

Seasonal Bd prevalence estimates in Southeastern Louisiana.Monthly Bd prevalence for all H. cinerea (black diamonds) and other amphibian species (open gray circles) species tested across 15 field sites. Error bars are ±95% confidence intervals.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369911&req=5

pone-0038473-g002: Seasonal Bd prevalence estimates in Southeastern Louisiana.Monthly Bd prevalence for all H. cinerea (black diamonds) and other amphibian species (open gray circles) species tested across 15 field sites. Error bars are ±95% confidence intervals.
Mentions: A total of 782 amphibians from 15 sites in southeastern Louisiana were tested for Bd between November 2010 and October 2011 to provide Bd prevalence and seasonality data (Figs. 1 and 2, Table S1). Post-metamorphic Hyla cinerea (juveniles and adults, n = 258) were sampled from 9 of these sites (Table 1). Animals were captured using nitrile-gloved hands, swabbed (with swab MW113, Medical Wire and Equipment Co.), and then released where they were caught. The skin surface of each frog was swabbed 40 times: five times on each of the dorsum, venter and sides, as well as the underside of each foot. Clean gloves were used to handle each animal.

Bottom Line: Although we were able to infect H. cinerea with Bd in the lab, we did not observe any clinical signs of chytridiomycosis.Furthermore, infection by Bd does not appear to negatively affect body condition or growth rate of post-metamorphic individuals.Our results suggest that H. cinerea is not susceptible to chytridiomycosis post-metamorphosis and probably is not an important carrier of the fungal pathogen Bd in the southeastern United States, although susceptibility at the larval stage remains unknown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States of America. lbrannel@tulane.edu

ABSTRACT
Amphibians worldwide are experiencing devastating declines, some of which are due to the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd). Populations in the southeastern United States, however, have not been noticeably affected by the pathogen. The green treefrog (Hyla cinerea) is abundant and widespread in the southeastern United States, but has not been documented to harbor Bd infection. This study examined the susceptibility of H. cinerea to two strains of Bd in the lab and the prevalence of infection in wild populations of this species in southeastern Louisiana. Although we were able to infect H. cinerea with Bd in the lab, we did not observe any clinical signs of chytridiomycosis. Furthermore, infection by Bd does not appear to negatively affect body condition or growth rate of post-metamorphic individuals. We found no evidence of infection in surveys of wild H. cinerea. Our results suggest that H. cinerea is not susceptible to chytridiomycosis post-metamorphosis and probably is not an important carrier of the fungal pathogen Bd in the southeastern United States, although susceptibility at the larval stage remains unknown.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus