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Perception of loudness is influenced by emotion.

Asutay E, Västfjäll D - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: We tested the hypothesis that loudness perception can be influenced by negative affect using a conditioning paradigm, where some auditory stimuli were paired with aversive experiences while others were not.We found that the same auditory stimulus was reported as being louder, more negative and fear-inducing when it was conditioned with an aversive experience, compared to when it was used as a control stimulus.This result provides support for an important role of emotion in auditory perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. erkin.asutay@chalmers.se

ABSTRACT
Loudness perception is thought to be a modular system that is unaffected by other brain systems. We tested the hypothesis that loudness perception can be influenced by negative affect using a conditioning paradigm, where some auditory stimuli were paired with aversive experiences while others were not. We found that the same auditory stimulus was reported as being louder, more negative and fear-inducing when it was conditioned with an aversive experience, compared to when it was used as a control stimulus. This result provides support for an important role of emotion in auditory perception.

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Results.(A) Mean EDA induced by auditory and tactile stimuli during conditioning phase shown for the two conditioning groups (CS+: 250 Hz vs. CS+: 2 kHz). SE is indicated. (B) Average EDA induced by CS+ and CS- in the conditioning phase (the two conditioning groups combined) at different trials. Standard errors of the means are indicated. (C) Interaction effect of conditioning group and sound on loudness (top), fear (middle) and valence (bottom) judgments. Main effects and grand means are removed. SE is indicated.
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pone-0038660-g002: Results.(A) Mean EDA induced by auditory and tactile stimuli during conditioning phase shown for the two conditioning groups (CS+: 250 Hz vs. CS+: 2 kHz). SE is indicated. (B) Average EDA induced by CS+ and CS- in the conditioning phase (the two conditioning groups combined) at different trials. Standard errors of the means are indicated. (C) Interaction effect of conditioning group and sound on loudness (top), fear (middle) and valence (bottom) judgments. Main effects and grand means are removed. SE is indicated.

Mentions: First, the EDA responses to auditory and tactile stimuli during the conditioning phase were investigated (Figure 2A). Tactile stimulation induced significantly higher EDA compared to auditory stimuli (F(1,32) = 122.46, p<.001, η2 = .79; and F(1,32) = 109.66, p<.001, η2 = .77 for 250 Hz and 2 kHz band noise, respectively). Further, consistent with previous conditioning literature [26], a significant conditioning group and sound interaction indicated that participants in both groups had higher EDA when they heard CS+ compared to CS- (F(1,32) = 4.82, p<.05, η2 = .13, Figure 2A, 2B). These findings suggest that tactile stimulation was emotionally arousing on its own, and that we successfully altered the emotion associated with the auditory stimuli.


Perception of loudness is influenced by emotion.

Asutay E, Västfjäll D - PLoS ONE (2012)

Results.(A) Mean EDA induced by auditory and tactile stimuli during conditioning phase shown for the two conditioning groups (CS+: 250 Hz vs. CS+: 2 kHz). SE is indicated. (B) Average EDA induced by CS+ and CS- in the conditioning phase (the two conditioning groups combined) at different trials. Standard errors of the means are indicated. (C) Interaction effect of conditioning group and sound on loudness (top), fear (middle) and valence (bottom) judgments. Main effects and grand means are removed. SE is indicated.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369848&req=5

pone-0038660-g002: Results.(A) Mean EDA induced by auditory and tactile stimuli during conditioning phase shown for the two conditioning groups (CS+: 250 Hz vs. CS+: 2 kHz). SE is indicated. (B) Average EDA induced by CS+ and CS- in the conditioning phase (the two conditioning groups combined) at different trials. Standard errors of the means are indicated. (C) Interaction effect of conditioning group and sound on loudness (top), fear (middle) and valence (bottom) judgments. Main effects and grand means are removed. SE is indicated.
Mentions: First, the EDA responses to auditory and tactile stimuli during the conditioning phase were investigated (Figure 2A). Tactile stimulation induced significantly higher EDA compared to auditory stimuli (F(1,32) = 122.46, p<.001, η2 = .79; and F(1,32) = 109.66, p<.001, η2 = .77 for 250 Hz and 2 kHz band noise, respectively). Further, consistent with previous conditioning literature [26], a significant conditioning group and sound interaction indicated that participants in both groups had higher EDA when they heard CS+ compared to CS- (F(1,32) = 4.82, p<.05, η2 = .13, Figure 2A, 2B). These findings suggest that tactile stimulation was emotionally arousing on its own, and that we successfully altered the emotion associated with the auditory stimuli.

Bottom Line: We tested the hypothesis that loudness perception can be influenced by negative affect using a conditioning paradigm, where some auditory stimuli were paired with aversive experiences while others were not.We found that the same auditory stimulus was reported as being louder, more negative and fear-inducing when it was conditioned with an aversive experience, compared to when it was used as a control stimulus.This result provides support for an important role of emotion in auditory perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. erkin.asutay@chalmers.se

ABSTRACT
Loudness perception is thought to be a modular system that is unaffected by other brain systems. We tested the hypothesis that loudness perception can be influenced by negative affect using a conditioning paradigm, where some auditory stimuli were paired with aversive experiences while others were not. We found that the same auditory stimulus was reported as being louder, more negative and fear-inducing when it was conditioned with an aversive experience, compared to when it was used as a control stimulus. This result provides support for an important role of emotion in auditory perception.

Show MeSH