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Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 from animals and humans.

Schroeder CM, Meng J, Zhao S, DebRoy C, Torcolini J, Zhao C, McDermott PF, Wagner DD, Walker RD, White DG - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Bottom Line: Approximately 50% of the 534 isolates from food animals were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin.Of 195 isolates with STEC-related virulence genes, approximately 40% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin.Findings from this study suggest antimicrobial resistance is widespread among E. coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 inhabiting humans and food animals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Maryland, College Park, USA.

ABSTRACT
Susceptibilities to fourteen antimicrobial agents important in clinical medicine and agriculture were determined for 752 Escherichia coli isolates of serotypes O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145. Strains of these serotypes may cause urinary tract and enteric infections in humans and have been implicated in infections with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Approximately 50% of the 137 isolates from humans were resistant to ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, cephalothin, tetracycline, or streptomycin, and approximately 25% were resistant to chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Approximately 50% of the 534 isolates from food animals were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin. Of 195 isolates with STEC-related virulence genes, approximately 40% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin. Findings from this study suggest antimicrobial resistance is widespread among E. coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 inhabiting humans and food animals.

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Comparison of antimicrobial resistance frequencies for Escherichia coli isolates from different sources. Am, ampicillin; Cx, cefoxitin; C, chloramphenicol; Frx, ceftriaxone; Smx, sulfamethoxazole; Cf, cephalothin; Gm, gentamicin; NA, nalidixic acid; Cip, ciprofloxacin; Fur, ceftiofur; Te, tetracycline; T/S, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; A/C, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; Str, streptomycin.
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Figure 1: Comparison of antimicrobial resistance frequencies for Escherichia coli isolates from different sources. Am, ampicillin; Cx, cefoxitin; C, chloramphenicol; Frx, ceftriaxone; Smx, sulfamethoxazole; Cf, cephalothin; Gm, gentamicin; NA, nalidixic acid; Cip, ciprofloxacin; Fur, ceftiofur; Te, tetracycline; T/S, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; A/C, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; Str, streptomycin.

Mentions: Of the isolates in this study, the highest frequencies of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes were observed for E. coli isolates from humans and turkeys (Figure 1). Fifty-nine percent of isolates from humans were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 59% to streptomycin, 56% to ampicillin, 56% to tetracycline, 50% to cephalothin, 38% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 34% to chloramphenicol, and 18% to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (Figure 1A). Eighty-four percent of isolates from turkeys were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, followed by 82% to streptomycin, 71% to tetracycline, 49% to ampicillin, 39% to cephalothin, 28% to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, 24% to gentamicin, and 20% to nalidixic acid (Figure 1B). Nalidixic acid-resistant isolates from turkeys were found to have ciprofloxacin MICs ranging from 0.12 to >8 µg/mL, whereas each of the nalidixic acid-susceptible isolates from these animals were found to have ciprofloxacin MICs of 0.03 µg/mL or less (data not shown).


Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 from animals and humans.

Schroeder CM, Meng J, Zhao S, DebRoy C, Torcolini J, Zhao C, McDermott PF, Wagner DD, Walker RD, White DG - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Comparison of antimicrobial resistance frequencies for Escherichia coli isolates from different sources. Am, ampicillin; Cx, cefoxitin; C, chloramphenicol; Frx, ceftriaxone; Smx, sulfamethoxazole; Cf, cephalothin; Gm, gentamicin; NA, nalidixic acid; Cip, ciprofloxacin; Fur, ceftiofur; Te, tetracycline; T/S, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; A/C, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; Str, streptomycin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369591&req=5

Figure 1: Comparison of antimicrobial resistance frequencies for Escherichia coli isolates from different sources. Am, ampicillin; Cx, cefoxitin; C, chloramphenicol; Frx, ceftriaxone; Smx, sulfamethoxazole; Cf, cephalothin; Gm, gentamicin; NA, nalidixic acid; Cip, ciprofloxacin; Fur, ceftiofur; Te, tetracycline; T/S, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; A/C, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; Str, streptomycin.
Mentions: Of the isolates in this study, the highest frequencies of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes were observed for E. coli isolates from humans and turkeys (Figure 1). Fifty-nine percent of isolates from humans were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 59% to streptomycin, 56% to ampicillin, 56% to tetracycline, 50% to cephalothin, 38% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 34% to chloramphenicol, and 18% to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (Figure 1A). Eighty-four percent of isolates from turkeys were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, followed by 82% to streptomycin, 71% to tetracycline, 49% to ampicillin, 39% to cephalothin, 28% to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, 24% to gentamicin, and 20% to nalidixic acid (Figure 1B). Nalidixic acid-resistant isolates from turkeys were found to have ciprofloxacin MICs ranging from 0.12 to >8 µg/mL, whereas each of the nalidixic acid-susceptible isolates from these animals were found to have ciprofloxacin MICs of 0.03 µg/mL or less (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Approximately 50% of the 534 isolates from food animals were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin.Of 195 isolates with STEC-related virulence genes, approximately 40% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin.Findings from this study suggest antimicrobial resistance is widespread among E. coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 inhabiting humans and food animals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Maryland, College Park, USA.

ABSTRACT
Susceptibilities to fourteen antimicrobial agents important in clinical medicine and agriculture were determined for 752 Escherichia coli isolates of serotypes O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145. Strains of these serotypes may cause urinary tract and enteric infections in humans and have been implicated in infections with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Approximately 50% of the 137 isolates from humans were resistant to ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, cephalothin, tetracycline, or streptomycin, and approximately 25% were resistant to chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Approximately 50% of the 534 isolates from food animals were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin. Of 195 isolates with STEC-related virulence genes, approximately 40% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, or streptomycin. Findings from this study suggest antimicrobial resistance is widespread among E. coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 inhabiting humans and food animals.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus