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Entomologic and serologic evidence of zoonotic transmission of Babesia microti, eastern Switzerland.

Foppa IM, Krause PJ, Spielman A, Goethert H, Gern L, Brand B, Telford SR - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Bottom Line: DNA from pooled nymphal ticks amplified by polymerase chain reaction was highly homologous to published B. microti sequences.In addition, we measured seroprevalence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against B. microti antigen in nearby residents.Serum from 1.5% of the 396 human residents of the region reacted to B. microti antigen (>1:64), as determined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IgG).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated human risk for infection with Babesia microti at a site in eastern Switzerland where several B. microti-infected nymphal Ixodes ricinus ticks had been found. DNA from pooled nymphal ticks amplified by polymerase chain reaction was highly homologous to published B. microti sequences. More ticks carried babesial infection in the lower portion of the rectangular 0.7-ha grid than in the upper (11% vs. 0.8%). In addition, we measured seroprevalence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against B. microti antigen in nearby residents. Serum from 1.5% of the 396 human residents of the region reacted to B. microti antigen (>1:64), as determined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IgG). These observations constitute the first report demonstrating B. microti in a human-biting vector, associated with evidence of human exposure to this agent in a European site.

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Maximum parsimony bootstrap consensus tree of 18S rDNA. GenBank accession nos.: Babesia microti-Slovenia AF373332; B. microti-Switzerland AF494286; B. microti- Nantucket AF231348; "Toxoplasma annae" AF188001; B. rodhaini AB049999; WA1 AF158700; B. gibsoni 1 AF158702; B. divergens 1 U07885; B. divergens 2 U16370; B. odocoilei U16369; B. gibsoni 2 AF175300; B. gibsoni 3 AF175301; and Toxoplasma gondii X68523.
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Figure 2: Maximum parsimony bootstrap consensus tree of 18S rDNA. GenBank accession nos.: Babesia microti-Slovenia AF373332; B. microti-Switzerland AF494286; B. microti- Nantucket AF231348; "Toxoplasma annae" AF188001; B. rodhaini AB049999; WA1 AF158700; B. gibsoni 1 AF158702; B. divergens 1 U07885; B. divergens 2 U16370; B. odocoilei U16369; B. gibsoni 2 AF175300; B. gibsoni 3 AF175301; and Toxoplasma gondii X68523.

Mentions: To verify the identity of the amplified DNA, a phylogenetic analysis was performed. The sequence amplified from our I. ricinus ticks, which was deposited in GenBank (accession no. AF494286), differed by l bp from the North American B. microti sequence (GenBank accession no. AF231348) and was identical with that of B. microti from Slovenia (GenBank accession no. AF373332). Accordingly, our sequence clearly clustered with the European and the American strain of B. microti (Figure 2), with concordant results from both maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses. Therefore, the piroplasms detected in I. ricinus ticks from Switzerland must be considered B. microti.


Entomologic and serologic evidence of zoonotic transmission of Babesia microti, eastern Switzerland.

Foppa IM, Krause PJ, Spielman A, Goethert H, Gern L, Brand B, Telford SR - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Maximum parsimony bootstrap consensus tree of 18S rDNA. GenBank accession nos.: Babesia microti-Slovenia AF373332; B. microti-Switzerland AF494286; B. microti- Nantucket AF231348; "Toxoplasma annae" AF188001; B. rodhaini AB049999; WA1 AF158700; B. gibsoni 1 AF158702; B. divergens 1 U07885; B. divergens 2 U16370; B. odocoilei U16369; B. gibsoni 2 AF175300; B. gibsoni 3 AF175301; and Toxoplasma gondii X68523.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369589&req=5

Figure 2: Maximum parsimony bootstrap consensus tree of 18S rDNA. GenBank accession nos.: Babesia microti-Slovenia AF373332; B. microti-Switzerland AF494286; B. microti- Nantucket AF231348; "Toxoplasma annae" AF188001; B. rodhaini AB049999; WA1 AF158700; B. gibsoni 1 AF158702; B. divergens 1 U07885; B. divergens 2 U16370; B. odocoilei U16369; B. gibsoni 2 AF175300; B. gibsoni 3 AF175301; and Toxoplasma gondii X68523.
Mentions: To verify the identity of the amplified DNA, a phylogenetic analysis was performed. The sequence amplified from our I. ricinus ticks, which was deposited in GenBank (accession no. AF494286), differed by l bp from the North American B. microti sequence (GenBank accession no. AF231348) and was identical with that of B. microti from Slovenia (GenBank accession no. AF373332). Accordingly, our sequence clearly clustered with the European and the American strain of B. microti (Figure 2), with concordant results from both maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses. Therefore, the piroplasms detected in I. ricinus ticks from Switzerland must be considered B. microti.

Bottom Line: DNA from pooled nymphal ticks amplified by polymerase chain reaction was highly homologous to published B. microti sequences.In addition, we measured seroprevalence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against B. microti antigen in nearby residents.Serum from 1.5% of the 396 human residents of the region reacted to B. microti antigen (>1:64), as determined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IgG).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

ABSTRACT
We evaluated human risk for infection with Babesia microti at a site in eastern Switzerland where several B. microti-infected nymphal Ixodes ricinus ticks had been found. DNA from pooled nymphal ticks amplified by polymerase chain reaction was highly homologous to published B. microti sequences. More ticks carried babesial infection in the lower portion of the rectangular 0.7-ha grid than in the upper (11% vs. 0.8%). In addition, we measured seroprevalence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against B. microti antigen in nearby residents. Serum from 1.5% of the 396 human residents of the region reacted to B. microti antigen (>1:64), as determined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IgG). These observations constitute the first report demonstrating B. microti in a human-biting vector, associated with evidence of human exposure to this agent in a European site.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus