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Epidemiology of Burkholderia cepacia complex in patients with cystic fibrosis, Canada.

Speert DP, Henry D, Vandamme P, Corey M, Mahenthiralingam E - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Bottom Line: To identify microbial clones with enhanced transmissibility, we evaluated B. cepacia complex isolates from patients with CF from throughout Canada.A total of 905 isolates from the B. cepacia complex were recovered from 447 patients in 8 of the 10 provinces; 369 (83%) of these patients had genomovar III and 43 (9.6%) had B. multivorans (genomovar II).Infection prevalence differed substantially by region (22% of patients in Ontario vs. 5% in Quebec).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of British Columbia and Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. speert@interchange.ubc.ca

ABSTRACT
The Burkholderia cepacia complex is an important group of pathogens in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Although evidence for patient-to-patient spread is clear, microbial factors facilitating transmission are poorly understood. To identify microbial clones with enhanced transmissibility, we evaluated B. cepacia complex isolates from patients with CF from throughout Canada. A total of 905 isolates from the B. cepacia complex were recovered from 447 patients in 8 of the 10 provinces; 369 (83%) of these patients had genomovar III and 43 (9.6%) had B. multivorans (genomovar II). Infection prevalence differed substantially by region (22% of patients in Ontario vs. 5% in Quebec). Results of typing by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that strains of B. cepacia complex from genomovar III are the most potentially transmissible and that the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker is a robust marker for transmissibility.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic analysis of the recA gene from the Burkholderia cepacia complex. The phylogenetic diversity of the B. cepacia complex observed after nucleotide sequence analysis of the recA gene is shown. Isolates recovered from Canadian CF patients that are representative of strains of currently indeterminate genomovar status (Table 2) appear in bold and lack species identification; all fall within the current B. cepacia complex. The tree was drawn as described (16). The recA sequence from Bordetella pertussis was used as a root, and the genetic distance is indicated by the bar.
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Figure 1: Phylogenetic analysis of the recA gene from the Burkholderia cepacia complex. The phylogenetic diversity of the B. cepacia complex observed after nucleotide sequence analysis of the recA gene is shown. Isolates recovered from Canadian CF patients that are representative of strains of currently indeterminate genomovar status (Table 2) appear in bold and lack species identification; all fall within the current B. cepacia complex. The tree was drawn as described (16). The recA sequence from Bordetella pertussis was used as a root, and the genetic distance is indicated by the bar.

Mentions: Eight patients were infected with B. cepacia complex bacteria that did not belong to any of the currently defined genomovars (Table 2). The full-length recA gene was amplified from these isolates by using primers BCR1 and BCR2 (17). These strains produced novel recA RFLP products, and none reacted with the PCR primers developed to identify the current genomovars (17,18). Their biochemical profile was consistent with that of the B. cepacia complex (data not shown). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene by RFLP demonstrated that these strains were not B. multivorans, B. vietnamiensis, or genomovar VI, since they had the single RFLP profile shared by all the remaining current genomovars/species (B. stabilis, I, III, and VII; pattern 2 [17]). The nucleotide sequence of the recA gene from five isolates representative of these novel strains was examined phylogenetically (Figure). These strains form two unique, distinct clusters with the current B. cepacia complex (Figure), suggesting that they are members of the current complex but may be novel taxonomic groups or subgroups of the existing genomovars not detected by the current molecular tests.


Epidemiology of Burkholderia cepacia complex in patients with cystic fibrosis, Canada.

Speert DP, Henry D, Vandamme P, Corey M, Mahenthiralingam E - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Phylogenetic analysis of the recA gene from the Burkholderia cepacia complex. The phylogenetic diversity of the B. cepacia complex observed after nucleotide sequence analysis of the recA gene is shown. Isolates recovered from Canadian CF patients that are representative of strains of currently indeterminate genomovar status (Table 2) appear in bold and lack species identification; all fall within the current B. cepacia complex. The tree was drawn as described (16). The recA sequence from Bordetella pertussis was used as a root, and the genetic distance is indicated by the bar.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369581&req=5

Figure 1: Phylogenetic analysis of the recA gene from the Burkholderia cepacia complex. The phylogenetic diversity of the B. cepacia complex observed after nucleotide sequence analysis of the recA gene is shown. Isolates recovered from Canadian CF patients that are representative of strains of currently indeterminate genomovar status (Table 2) appear in bold and lack species identification; all fall within the current B. cepacia complex. The tree was drawn as described (16). The recA sequence from Bordetella pertussis was used as a root, and the genetic distance is indicated by the bar.
Mentions: Eight patients were infected with B. cepacia complex bacteria that did not belong to any of the currently defined genomovars (Table 2). The full-length recA gene was amplified from these isolates by using primers BCR1 and BCR2 (17). These strains produced novel recA RFLP products, and none reacted with the PCR primers developed to identify the current genomovars (17,18). Their biochemical profile was consistent with that of the B. cepacia complex (data not shown). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene by RFLP demonstrated that these strains were not B. multivorans, B. vietnamiensis, or genomovar VI, since they had the single RFLP profile shared by all the remaining current genomovars/species (B. stabilis, I, III, and VII; pattern 2 [17]). The nucleotide sequence of the recA gene from five isolates representative of these novel strains was examined phylogenetically (Figure). These strains form two unique, distinct clusters with the current B. cepacia complex (Figure), suggesting that they are members of the current complex but may be novel taxonomic groups or subgroups of the existing genomovars not detected by the current molecular tests.

Bottom Line: To identify microbial clones with enhanced transmissibility, we evaluated B. cepacia complex isolates from patients with CF from throughout Canada.A total of 905 isolates from the B. cepacia complex were recovered from 447 patients in 8 of the 10 provinces; 369 (83%) of these patients had genomovar III and 43 (9.6%) had B. multivorans (genomovar II).Infection prevalence differed substantially by region (22% of patients in Ontario vs. 5% in Quebec).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of British Columbia and Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. speert@interchange.ubc.ca

ABSTRACT
The Burkholderia cepacia complex is an important group of pathogens in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Although evidence for patient-to-patient spread is clear, microbial factors facilitating transmission are poorly understood. To identify microbial clones with enhanced transmissibility, we evaluated B. cepacia complex isolates from patients with CF from throughout Canada. A total of 905 isolates from the B. cepacia complex were recovered from 447 patients in 8 of the 10 provinces; 369 (83%) of these patients had genomovar III and 43 (9.6%) had B. multivorans (genomovar II). Infection prevalence differed substantially by region (22% of patients in Ontario vs. 5% in Quebec). Results of typing by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that strains of B. cepacia complex from genomovar III are the most potentially transmissible and that the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker is a robust marker for transmissibility.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus