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Listeria monocytogenes infection in Israel and review of cases worldwide.

Siegman-Igra Y, Levin R, Weinberger M, Golan Y, Schwartz D, Samra Z, Konigsberger H, Yinnon A, Rahav G, Keller N, Bisharat N, Karpuch J, Finkelstein R, Alkan M, Landau Z, Novikov J, Hassin D, Rudnicki C, Kitzes R, Ovadia S, Shimoni Z, Lang R, Shohat T - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Bottom Line: From 1995 to 1999, 161 cases were identified; 70 (43%) were perinatal infections, with a fetal mortality rate of 45%.The common clinical syndromes in these patients were primary bacteremia (47%) and meningitis (28%).The crude case-fatality rate in this group was 38%, with a higher death rate in immunocompromised patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Infectious Diseases Unit, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizman Street, Tel-Aviv 64239, Israel. ZIHUM@tasmc.health.gov.il

ABSTRACT
Listeria monocytogenes, an uncommon foodborne pathogen, is increasingly recognized as a cause of life-threatening disease. A marked increase in reported cases of listeriosis during 1998 motivated a retrospective nationwide survey of the infection in Israel. From 1995 to 1999, 161 cases were identified; 70 (43%) were perinatal infections, with a fetal mortality rate of 45%. Most (74%) of the 91 nonperinatal infections involved immunocompromised patients with malignancies, chronic liver disease, chronic renal failure, or diabetes mellitus. The common clinical syndromes in these patients were primary bacteremia (47%) and meningitis (28%). The crude case-fatality rate in this group was 38%, with a higher death rate in immunocompromised patients.

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Age distribution of 87 nonperinatal cases of Listeria monocytogenes infection by immune-status group, Israel, 1995-1999.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 3: Age distribution of 87 nonperinatal cases of Listeria monocytogenes infection by immune-status group, Israel, 1995-1999.

Mentions: The mean age of the 87 nonperinatal cases with available clinical information was 67 years (range 4-91), 66 (76%) were ≥60 years of age (Figure 3); 56 (64%) were male. Sixty-four patients (74%) had severe immunocompromising conditions (Table 1). Of 45 patients (52%) with malignant disease, most had received chemotherapy, steroid therapy, or both during the month before the Lm infection. Other immunocompromising conditions were chronic renal failure (11 patients, 4 of whom were on hemodialysis), chronic liver disease (10 patients, mostly with cirrhosis), and diabetes mellitus (13 patients). Some of these patients had additional immunocompromising conditions (Table 1). Twenty-three patients (26%) were not immunocompromised. Most (19 [83%] of 23) were ≥63 years of age; some had concomitant conditions not considered to be immunocompromising, including three patients with valvular heart disease, predisposing them to endocarditis. Only four immunocompetent patients were <60 years of age, including a 4-year-old girl and a 38-year-old man with primary bacteremia, a 22-year-old woman with typical pyelonephritis and Lm cultured from blood only, and a 51-year-old man who had gastroenteritis and positive blood cultures (stool was not cultured for Lm).


Listeria monocytogenes infection in Israel and review of cases worldwide.

Siegman-Igra Y, Levin R, Weinberger M, Golan Y, Schwartz D, Samra Z, Konigsberger H, Yinnon A, Rahav G, Keller N, Bisharat N, Karpuch J, Finkelstein R, Alkan M, Landau Z, Novikov J, Hassin D, Rudnicki C, Kitzes R, Ovadia S, Shimoni Z, Lang R, Shohat T - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2002)

Age distribution of 87 nonperinatal cases of Listeria monocytogenes infection by immune-status group, Israel, 1995-1999.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369577&req=5

Figure 3: Age distribution of 87 nonperinatal cases of Listeria monocytogenes infection by immune-status group, Israel, 1995-1999.
Mentions: The mean age of the 87 nonperinatal cases with available clinical information was 67 years (range 4-91), 66 (76%) were ≥60 years of age (Figure 3); 56 (64%) were male. Sixty-four patients (74%) had severe immunocompromising conditions (Table 1). Of 45 patients (52%) with malignant disease, most had received chemotherapy, steroid therapy, or both during the month before the Lm infection. Other immunocompromising conditions were chronic renal failure (11 patients, 4 of whom were on hemodialysis), chronic liver disease (10 patients, mostly with cirrhosis), and diabetes mellitus (13 patients). Some of these patients had additional immunocompromising conditions (Table 1). Twenty-three patients (26%) were not immunocompromised. Most (19 [83%] of 23) were ≥63 years of age; some had concomitant conditions not considered to be immunocompromising, including three patients with valvular heart disease, predisposing them to endocarditis. Only four immunocompetent patients were <60 years of age, including a 4-year-old girl and a 38-year-old man with primary bacteremia, a 22-year-old woman with typical pyelonephritis and Lm cultured from blood only, and a 51-year-old man who had gastroenteritis and positive blood cultures (stool was not cultured for Lm).

Bottom Line: From 1995 to 1999, 161 cases were identified; 70 (43%) were perinatal infections, with a fetal mortality rate of 45%.The common clinical syndromes in these patients were primary bacteremia (47%) and meningitis (28%).The crude case-fatality rate in this group was 38%, with a higher death rate in immunocompromised patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Infectious Diseases Unit, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizman Street, Tel-Aviv 64239, Israel. ZIHUM@tasmc.health.gov.il

ABSTRACT
Listeria monocytogenes, an uncommon foodborne pathogen, is increasingly recognized as a cause of life-threatening disease. A marked increase in reported cases of listeriosis during 1998 motivated a retrospective nationwide survey of the infection in Israel. From 1995 to 1999, 161 cases were identified; 70 (43%) were perinatal infections, with a fetal mortality rate of 45%. Most (74%) of the 91 nonperinatal infections involved immunocompromised patients with malignancies, chronic liver disease, chronic renal failure, or diabetes mellitus. The common clinical syndromes in these patients were primary bacteremia (47%) and meningitis (28%). The crude case-fatality rate in this group was 38%, with a higher death rate in immunocompromised patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus