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An in vivo study of turbidity suppression by optical phase conjugation (TSOPC) on rabbit ear.

Cui M, McDowell EJ, Yang C - Opt Express (2010)

Bottom Line: We present a holography-based in vivo optical phase conjugation experiment performed on a living rabbit ear.We monitor the signal decay time variation after the ear is excised to postulate different mechanisms that cause the signal decay.The experimental findings address the minimum speed limit of a broad range of optical time reversal experiments for in vivo applications on tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. mcui@caltech.edu

ABSTRACT
We present a holography-based in vivo optical phase conjugation experiment performed on a living rabbit ear. The motion of live tissues caused the phase conjugate signal to decay with a consistent decay time of less than two seconds. We monitor the signal decay time variation after the ear is excised to postulate different mechanisms that cause the signal decay. The experimental findings address the minimum speed limit of a broad range of optical time reversal experiments for in vivo applications on tissues.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

TSOPC signal vs. sample displacement during playback. The data are fitted with a Gaussian function (red line).
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g002: TSOPC signal vs. sample displacement during playback. The data are fitted with a Gaussian function (red line).

Mentions: We were interested in measuring the sensitivity of the reconstructed TSOPC signal to tissue variation. To investigate the minimum length scale on which sample perturbations affected the TSOPC measurement, we mounted a 1.6 mm thick tissue phantom composed of polystyrene microspheres (1 micron in diameter, weight concentration 1.77%) suspended in a polyacrylamide hydrogel on a translational stage driven by a piezo actuator. The product of the scattering coefficient of the phantom and the sample thickness was µsL = 130. A laboratory-built laser fringe tracking system was employed to monitor the stage position with better than 30 nm accuracy. After the holographic recording (experimental step one), we displaced the sample and monitored the TSOPC signal variation. Figure 2Fig. 2


An in vivo study of turbidity suppression by optical phase conjugation (TSOPC) on rabbit ear.

Cui M, McDowell EJ, Yang C - Opt Express (2010)

TSOPC signal vs. sample displacement during playback. The data are fitted with a Gaussian function (red line).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369536&req=5

g002: TSOPC signal vs. sample displacement during playback. The data are fitted with a Gaussian function (red line).
Mentions: We were interested in measuring the sensitivity of the reconstructed TSOPC signal to tissue variation. To investigate the minimum length scale on which sample perturbations affected the TSOPC measurement, we mounted a 1.6 mm thick tissue phantom composed of polystyrene microspheres (1 micron in diameter, weight concentration 1.77%) suspended in a polyacrylamide hydrogel on a translational stage driven by a piezo actuator. The product of the scattering coefficient of the phantom and the sample thickness was µsL = 130. A laboratory-built laser fringe tracking system was employed to monitor the stage position with better than 30 nm accuracy. After the holographic recording (experimental step one), we displaced the sample and monitored the TSOPC signal variation. Figure 2Fig. 2

Bottom Line: We present a holography-based in vivo optical phase conjugation experiment performed on a living rabbit ear.We monitor the signal decay time variation after the ear is excised to postulate different mechanisms that cause the signal decay.The experimental findings address the minimum speed limit of a broad range of optical time reversal experiments for in vivo applications on tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. mcui@caltech.edu

ABSTRACT
We present a holography-based in vivo optical phase conjugation experiment performed on a living rabbit ear. The motion of live tissues caused the phase conjugate signal to decay with a consistent decay time of less than two seconds. We monitor the signal decay time variation after the ear is excised to postulate different mechanisms that cause the signal decay. The experimental findings address the minimum speed limit of a broad range of optical time reversal experiments for in vivo applications on tissues.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus