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A new piezoelectric actuator induces bone formation in vivo: a preliminary study.

Reis J, Frias C, Canto e Castro C, Botelho ML, Marques AT, Simões JA, Capela e Silva F, Potes J - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Bottom Line: After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls.Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas.The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Évora, 7002-554 Évora, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
This in vivo study presents the preliminary results of the use of a novel piezoelectric actuator for orthopedic application. The innovative use of the converse piezoelectric effect to mechanically stimulate bone was achieved with polyvinylidene fluoride actuators implanted in osteotomy cuts in sheep femur and tibia. The biological response around the osteotomies was assessed through histology and histomorphometry in nondecalcified sections and histochemistry and immunohistochemistry in decalcified sections, namely, through Masson's trichrome, and labeling of osteopontin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls. Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas. In these areas, osteopontin increased expression was observed. The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

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Microphotograph of nondecalcified sections. On top, (a) shows Z3 areas of actuator and (b) shows static control, both implanted in the same position in tibia. On bottom, Z2 areas showing increase labeled area in (c) femoral actuator when compared to contra lateral (d) static control. A fibrous capsule (FC) was present on the bone/film interface. Scale bar represents 200 μm.
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fig5: Microphotograph of nondecalcified sections. On top, (a) shows Z3 areas of actuator and (b) shows static control, both implanted in the same position in tibia. On bottom, Z2 areas showing increase labeled area in (c) femoral actuator when compared to contra lateral (d) static control. A fibrous capsule (FC) was present on the bone/film interface. Scale bar represents 200 μm.

Mentions: The increment of bone occupied area was due to new bone formation, and in actuators the area occupied by woven bone and osteoid was 64.89 ± 19.32% of the total bone area versus 31.72 ± 14.54% in static devices (Figure 5). The chosen staining technique, Giemsa Eosin, stains older bone in a darker shade of pink, whilst more recently deposed bone is of a lighter pink color and frequently adjacent to much less prominent osteoid (dark blue) areas (Figures 5(a) and 5(b)). Taking into account the close relation in between osteoid and woven, recently formed bone, the authors chose not to make separated measurements that could be misleading. The bone marrow present in the sections showed no relevant alterations.


A new piezoelectric actuator induces bone formation in vivo: a preliminary study.

Reis J, Frias C, Canto e Castro C, Botelho ML, Marques AT, Simões JA, Capela e Silva F, Potes J - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Microphotograph of nondecalcified sections. On top, (a) shows Z3 areas of actuator and (b) shows static control, both implanted in the same position in tibia. On bottom, Z2 areas showing increase labeled area in (c) femoral actuator when compared to contra lateral (d) static control. A fibrous capsule (FC) was present on the bone/film interface. Scale bar represents 200 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369535&req=5

fig5: Microphotograph of nondecalcified sections. On top, (a) shows Z3 areas of actuator and (b) shows static control, both implanted in the same position in tibia. On bottom, Z2 areas showing increase labeled area in (c) femoral actuator when compared to contra lateral (d) static control. A fibrous capsule (FC) was present on the bone/film interface. Scale bar represents 200 μm.
Mentions: The increment of bone occupied area was due to new bone formation, and in actuators the area occupied by woven bone and osteoid was 64.89 ± 19.32% of the total bone area versus 31.72 ± 14.54% in static devices (Figure 5). The chosen staining technique, Giemsa Eosin, stains older bone in a darker shade of pink, whilst more recently deposed bone is of a lighter pink color and frequently adjacent to much less prominent osteoid (dark blue) areas (Figures 5(a) and 5(b)). Taking into account the close relation in between osteoid and woven, recently formed bone, the authors chose not to make separated measurements that could be misleading. The bone marrow present in the sections showed no relevant alterations.

Bottom Line: After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls.Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas.The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Évora, 7002-554 Évora, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
This in vivo study presents the preliminary results of the use of a novel piezoelectric actuator for orthopedic application. The innovative use of the converse piezoelectric effect to mechanically stimulate bone was achieved with polyvinylidene fluoride actuators implanted in osteotomy cuts in sheep femur and tibia. The biological response around the osteotomies was assessed through histology and histomorphometry in nondecalcified sections and histochemistry and immunohistochemistry in decalcified sections, namely, through Masson's trichrome, and labeling of osteopontin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls. Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas. In these areas, osteopontin increased expression was observed. The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus