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A new piezoelectric actuator induces bone formation in vivo: a preliminary study.

Reis J, Frias C, Canto e Castro C, Botelho ML, Marques AT, Simões JA, Capela e Silva F, Potes J - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Bottom Line: After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls.Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas.The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Évora, 7002-554 Évora, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
This in vivo study presents the preliminary results of the use of a novel piezoelectric actuator for orthopedic application. The innovative use of the converse piezoelectric effect to mechanically stimulate bone was achieved with polyvinylidene fluoride actuators implanted in osteotomy cuts in sheep femur and tibia. The biological response around the osteotomies was assessed through histology and histomorphometry in nondecalcified sections and histochemistry and immunohistochemistry in decalcified sections, namely, through Masson's trichrome, and labeling of osteopontin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls. Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas. In these areas, osteopontin increased expression was observed. The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

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Total bone area measured around actuators and static controls, expressed in percentage. Bars represent means and error bars standard deviation.
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fig4: Total bone area measured around actuators and static controls, expressed in percentage. Bars represent means and error bars standard deviation.

Mentions: After one-month implantation period, there were statistically significant differences. Total bone area around the actuators was significantly higher, when comparing to static controls (39.91 ± 14.08% versus 27.20 ± 11.98%) (Figure 4).


A new piezoelectric actuator induces bone formation in vivo: a preliminary study.

Reis J, Frias C, Canto e Castro C, Botelho ML, Marques AT, Simões JA, Capela e Silva F, Potes J - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2012)

Total bone area measured around actuators and static controls, expressed in percentage. Bars represent means and error bars standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369535&req=5

fig4: Total bone area measured around actuators and static controls, expressed in percentage. Bars represent means and error bars standard deviation.
Mentions: After one-month implantation period, there were statistically significant differences. Total bone area around the actuators was significantly higher, when comparing to static controls (39.91 ± 14.08% versus 27.20 ± 11.98%) (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls.Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas.The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Évora, 7002-554 Évora, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
This in vivo study presents the preliminary results of the use of a novel piezoelectric actuator for orthopedic application. The innovative use of the converse piezoelectric effect to mechanically stimulate bone was achieved with polyvinylidene fluoride actuators implanted in osteotomy cuts in sheep femur and tibia. The biological response around the osteotomies was assessed through histology and histomorphometry in nondecalcified sections and histochemistry and immunohistochemistry in decalcified sections, namely, through Masson's trichrome, and labeling of osteopontin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. After one-month implantation, total bone area and new bone area were significantly higher around actuators when compared to static controls. Bone deposition rate was also significantly higher in the mechanically stimulated areas. In these areas, osteopontin increased expression was observed. The present in vivo study suggests that piezoelectric materials and the converse piezoelectric effect may be used to effectively stimulate bone growth.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus