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Iron-deficiency anemia as a rare cause of cerebral venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

Nicastro N, Schnider A, Leemann B - Case Rep Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare cause of stroke and has a wide spectrum of unspecific symptoms, which may delay diagnosis.There are many etiologies, including hematological disorders, trauma, infection, and dehydration.Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) has been reported as an extremely rare cause of CVT, especially in adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurorehabilitation, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospital (HUG), 1206 Genève, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare cause of stroke and has a wide spectrum of unspecific symptoms, which may delay diagnosis. There are many etiologies, including hematological disorders, trauma, infection, and dehydration. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) has been reported as an extremely rare cause of CVT, especially in adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain computed tomography showing superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and implication of a cortical vein (arrows).
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fig1: Brain computed tomography showing superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and implication of a cortical vein (arrows).

Mentions: A 63-year-old woman with no past history of coagulation abnormality, recent trauma, or hormonal substitution experienced sudden onset of headache followed by installation of right hemiplegia and global aphasia. Computed tomography and subsequent brain MRI revealed massive left frontotemporal hemorrhagic infarction and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus, left sigmoid/transverse sinus, and cortical vein (Figures 1, 2, and 3). Subsequently, chest tomography showed bilateral subsegmentary pulmonary embolism (Figure 4). Doppler did not reveal any deep venous thrombosis of the lower limbs.


Iron-deficiency anemia as a rare cause of cerebral venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

Nicastro N, Schnider A, Leemann B - Case Rep Med (2012)

Brain computed tomography showing superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and implication of a cortical vein (arrows).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369515&req=5

fig1: Brain computed tomography showing superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and implication of a cortical vein (arrows).
Mentions: A 63-year-old woman with no past history of coagulation abnormality, recent trauma, or hormonal substitution experienced sudden onset of headache followed by installation of right hemiplegia and global aphasia. Computed tomography and subsequent brain MRI revealed massive left frontotemporal hemorrhagic infarction and thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus, left sigmoid/transverse sinus, and cortical vein (Figures 1, 2, and 3). Subsequently, chest tomography showed bilateral subsegmentary pulmonary embolism (Figure 4). Doppler did not reveal any deep venous thrombosis of the lower limbs.

Bottom Line: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare cause of stroke and has a wide spectrum of unspecific symptoms, which may delay diagnosis.There are many etiologies, including hematological disorders, trauma, infection, and dehydration.Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) has been reported as an extremely rare cause of CVT, especially in adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurorehabilitation, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospital (HUG), 1206 Genève, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare cause of stroke and has a wide spectrum of unspecific symptoms, which may delay diagnosis. There are many etiologies, including hematological disorders, trauma, infection, and dehydration. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) has been reported as an extremely rare cause of CVT, especially in adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus