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Reactive oxygen species-mediated control of mitochondrial biogenesis.

Yoboue ED, Devin A - Int J Cell Biol (2012)

Bottom Line: Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process.The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance.In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS, Institut de Biochimie et Génétique Cellulaires, UMR 5095, 33000 Bordeaux, France.

ABSTRACT
Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process. It necessitates the contribution of both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes and therefore crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria. It is now well established that cellular mitochondrial content can vary according to a number of stimuli and physiological states in eukaryotes. The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance. The cellular redox state has been considered for a long time as a key element in the regulation of various processes. In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The HAP complex: a master regulator of the mitochondrial biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The four subunits constituting the complex are represented here. Size differences illustrate the difference in the predicted molecular weights of each subunit. The mitochondrial proteins encoding genes regulated by the complex are also indicated. See text for references.
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fig3: The HAP complex: a master regulator of the mitochondrial biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The four subunits constituting the complex are represented here. Size differences illustrate the difference in the predicted molecular weights of each subunit. The mitochondrial proteins encoding genes regulated by the complex are also indicated. See text for references.

Mentions: Similarly to what was shown in mammalian cells, the first identification of transcriptional factors regulating mitochondrial biogenesis in S. cerevisiae resulted from the study of the regulation of the cytochrome c gene expression (CYC1). The master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in S. cerevisiae is the HAP complex. It is constituted of four subunits: Hap2p, Hap3p, Hap4p, and Hap5p (Figure 3). Subunits 2, 3, and 5 are DNA binding subunits whereas Hap4p is the activator of the complex [68–72]. As illustrated in Figure 3, the HAP complex regulates the expression of many genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial functions [73, 74]. In accordance with that key role, the absence of any subunits of the HAP complex leads to a growth defect on nonfermentable medium (i.e., lactate or ethanol). During growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on fermentable medium (containing high glucose concentration (i.e., 2% (p/v)), there is a repression of the expression of several genes encoding mitochondrial proteins [75–77]. Under these conditions, it has been shown that overexpression of Hap4p, the activator subunit of the HAP complex, was sufficient to derepress those genes [74, 78]. These results strengthen the main role played by the HAP complex in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. For a long time, the only known signal regulating the HAP complex was the carbon source. Indeed, whereas Hap2p, Hap3p, and Hap5p are constitutively expressed, Hap4p expression is maintained at a very low level during growth on fermentable substrates. Growth on nonfermentable substrates strongly induces Hap4p expression and thus the activity of the HAP complex [71].


Reactive oxygen species-mediated control of mitochondrial biogenesis.

Yoboue ED, Devin A - Int J Cell Biol (2012)

The HAP complex: a master regulator of the mitochondrial biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The four subunits constituting the complex are represented here. Size differences illustrate the difference in the predicted molecular weights of each subunit. The mitochondrial proteins encoding genes regulated by the complex are also indicated. See text for references.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369472&req=5

fig3: The HAP complex: a master regulator of the mitochondrial biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The four subunits constituting the complex are represented here. Size differences illustrate the difference in the predicted molecular weights of each subunit. The mitochondrial proteins encoding genes regulated by the complex are also indicated. See text for references.
Mentions: Similarly to what was shown in mammalian cells, the first identification of transcriptional factors regulating mitochondrial biogenesis in S. cerevisiae resulted from the study of the regulation of the cytochrome c gene expression (CYC1). The master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in S. cerevisiae is the HAP complex. It is constituted of four subunits: Hap2p, Hap3p, Hap4p, and Hap5p (Figure 3). Subunits 2, 3, and 5 are DNA binding subunits whereas Hap4p is the activator of the complex [68–72]. As illustrated in Figure 3, the HAP complex regulates the expression of many genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial functions [73, 74]. In accordance with that key role, the absence of any subunits of the HAP complex leads to a growth defect on nonfermentable medium (i.e., lactate or ethanol). During growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on fermentable medium (containing high glucose concentration (i.e., 2% (p/v)), there is a repression of the expression of several genes encoding mitochondrial proteins [75–77]. Under these conditions, it has been shown that overexpression of Hap4p, the activator subunit of the HAP complex, was sufficient to derepress those genes [74, 78]. These results strengthen the main role played by the HAP complex in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. For a long time, the only known signal regulating the HAP complex was the carbon source. Indeed, whereas Hap2p, Hap3p, and Hap5p are constitutively expressed, Hap4p expression is maintained at a very low level during growth on fermentable substrates. Growth on nonfermentable substrates strongly induces Hap4p expression and thus the activity of the HAP complex [71].

Bottom Line: Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process.The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance.In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS, Institut de Biochimie et Génétique Cellulaires, UMR 5095, 33000 Bordeaux, France.

ABSTRACT
Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process. It necessitates the contribution of both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genomes and therefore crosstalk between the nucleus and mitochondria. It is now well established that cellular mitochondrial content can vary according to a number of stimuli and physiological states in eukaryotes. The knowledge of the actors and signals regulating the mitochondrial biogenesis is thus of high importance. The cellular redox state has been considered for a long time as a key element in the regulation of various processes. In this paper, we report the involvement of the oxidative stress in the regulation of some actors of mitochondrial biogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus