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Amnesia and pain relief after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a cancer pain patient: a case report.

Chon JY, Hahn YJ, Sung CH, Moon HS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2012)

Bottom Line: The mechanism of chronic pain is very complicated.After local anesthetics were injected, she had a seizure and then went into cardiac arrest.Following cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her cardiac rhythm returned to normal, but her memory had disappeared.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The mechanism of chronic pain is very complicated. Memory, pain, and opioid dependence appear to share common mechanism, including synaptic plasticity, and anatomical structures. A 48-yr-old woman with severe pain caused by bone metastasis of breast cancer received epidural block. After local anesthetics were injected, she had a seizure and then went into cardiac arrest. Following cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her cardiac rhythm returned to normal, but her memory had disappeared. Also, her excruciating pain and opioid dependence had disappeared. This complication, although uncommon, gives us a lot to think about a role of memory for chronic pain and opioid dependence.

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Radiography of the patient. A radiographic view shows multiple pathologic fractures on the vertebra and right 10th and 11th ribs.
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Figure 1: Radiography of the patient. A radiographic view shows multiple pathologic fractures on the vertebra and right 10th and 11th ribs.

Mentions: A 48-yr-old woman who was diagnosed with breast cancer 5 yr ago was transferred to our pain clinic for pain management on April 21, 2010. She had undergone a modified radical mastectomy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Cancer had spread to the cerebral meninges, bones, and liver. The patient experienced excruciating pain in her back and in her right lower chest area (Fig. 1). The pain had started 6 months earlier and became aggravated 2 months before admission. Her visual analog scale (VAS) score was 9-10/10, and she had received morphine (300 mg/day, intravenous administration). She had strong dependence on morphine. She always wanted morphine before every movement.


Amnesia and pain relief after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a cancer pain patient: a case report.

Chon JY, Hahn YJ, Sung CH, Moon HS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2012)

Radiography of the patient. A radiographic view shows multiple pathologic fractures on the vertebra and right 10th and 11th ribs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369462&req=5

Figure 1: Radiography of the patient. A radiographic view shows multiple pathologic fractures on the vertebra and right 10th and 11th ribs.
Mentions: A 48-yr-old woman who was diagnosed with breast cancer 5 yr ago was transferred to our pain clinic for pain management on April 21, 2010. She had undergone a modified radical mastectomy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Cancer had spread to the cerebral meninges, bones, and liver. The patient experienced excruciating pain in her back and in her right lower chest area (Fig. 1). The pain had started 6 months earlier and became aggravated 2 months before admission. Her visual analog scale (VAS) score was 9-10/10, and she had received morphine (300 mg/day, intravenous administration). She had strong dependence on morphine. She always wanted morphine before every movement.

Bottom Line: The mechanism of chronic pain is very complicated.After local anesthetics were injected, she had a seizure and then went into cardiac arrest.Following cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her cardiac rhythm returned to normal, but her memory had disappeared.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The mechanism of chronic pain is very complicated. Memory, pain, and opioid dependence appear to share common mechanism, including synaptic plasticity, and anatomical structures. A 48-yr-old woman with severe pain caused by bone metastasis of breast cancer received epidural block. After local anesthetics were injected, she had a seizure and then went into cardiac arrest. Following cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her cardiac rhythm returned to normal, but her memory had disappeared. Also, her excruciating pain and opioid dependence had disappeared. This complication, although uncommon, gives us a lot to think about a role of memory for chronic pain and opioid dependence.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus