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Low-grade inflammation, metabolic syndrome and the risk of chronic kidney disease: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Kang HT, Kim JK, Shim JY, Lee HR, Linton JA, Lee YJ - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2012)

Bottom Line: Either chronic inflammation or metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with renal impairment.In subjects with MetS, the prevalence risk for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile was 2.25 (1.28-3.95) even after fully adjusting for confounding variables.Low-grade inflammation is significantly associated with CKD stage 3 or more in subjects with MetS but not in those without MetS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Either chronic inflammation or metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with renal impairment. This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the relationship between elevated white blood cell (WBC) counts and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 or more according to the presence of MetS in adult Koreans. In total, 5,291 subjects (≥ 20 yr-old) participating in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination were included. CKD stage 3 or more was defined as having an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), as calculated using the formula from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile (≥ 7,200 cells/µL) was 1.70 (1.17-2.39) after adjusting for MetS and other covariates, compared with the lowest WBC quartile (< 5,100 cells/µL). In subjects with MetS, the prevalence risk for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile was 2.25 (1.28-3.95) even after fully adjusting for confounding variables. In contrast, this positive association between WBC quartile and CKD stage 3 or more disappeared in subjects without MetS. Low-grade inflammation is significantly associated with CKD stage 3 or more in subjects with MetS but not in those without MetS.

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Odds ratio for chronic kidney disease stage 3 or more of individuals with or without metabolic syndrome, according to WBC quartile. Logistic regression analysis model was adjusted for age, gender, SBP, fasting plasma glucose, energy intake, smoking status, alcohol-drinking status, and BMI.
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Figure 1: Odds ratio for chronic kidney disease stage 3 or more of individuals with or without metabolic syndrome, according to WBC quartile. Logistic regression analysis model was adjusted for age, gender, SBP, fasting plasma glucose, energy intake, smoking status, alcohol-drinking status, and BMI.

Mentions: To further evaluate the relationship between WBC quartile and CKD stage 3 or more in subjects with or without MetS, we conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses that were stratified according to MetS (Fig. 1). In subjects with MetS, the risk for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile is 2.25 (1.28-3.95), even after fully adjusting for confounding variables. In contrast, this positive association between CKD stage 3 or more and WBC quartile are not found in subjects without MetS.


Low-grade inflammation, metabolic syndrome and the risk of chronic kidney disease: the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Kang HT, Kim JK, Shim JY, Lee HR, Linton JA, Lee YJ - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2012)

Odds ratio for chronic kidney disease stage 3 or more of individuals with or without metabolic syndrome, according to WBC quartile. Logistic regression analysis model was adjusted for age, gender, SBP, fasting plasma glucose, energy intake, smoking status, alcohol-drinking status, and BMI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369449&req=5

Figure 1: Odds ratio for chronic kidney disease stage 3 or more of individuals with or without metabolic syndrome, according to WBC quartile. Logistic regression analysis model was adjusted for age, gender, SBP, fasting plasma glucose, energy intake, smoking status, alcohol-drinking status, and BMI.
Mentions: To further evaluate the relationship between WBC quartile and CKD stage 3 or more in subjects with or without MetS, we conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses that were stratified according to MetS (Fig. 1). In subjects with MetS, the risk for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile is 2.25 (1.28-3.95), even after fully adjusting for confounding variables. In contrast, this positive association between CKD stage 3 or more and WBC quartile are not found in subjects without MetS.

Bottom Line: Either chronic inflammation or metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with renal impairment.In subjects with MetS, the prevalence risk for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile was 2.25 (1.28-3.95) even after fully adjusting for confounding variables.Low-grade inflammation is significantly associated with CKD stage 3 or more in subjects with MetS but not in those without MetS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Either chronic inflammation or metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with renal impairment. This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the relationship between elevated white blood cell (WBC) counts and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 or more according to the presence of MetS in adult Koreans. In total, 5,291 subjects (≥ 20 yr-old) participating in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination were included. CKD stage 3 or more was defined as having an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2), as calculated using the formula from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile (≥ 7,200 cells/µL) was 1.70 (1.17-2.39) after adjusting for MetS and other covariates, compared with the lowest WBC quartile (< 5,100 cells/µL). In subjects with MetS, the prevalence risk for CKD stage 3 or more in the highest WBC quartile was 2.25 (1.28-3.95) even after fully adjusting for confounding variables. In contrast, this positive association between WBC quartile and CKD stage 3 or more disappeared in subjects without MetS. Low-grade inflammation is significantly associated with CKD stage 3 or more in subjects with MetS but not in those without MetS.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus