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Behavioral predictors of colonization with Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus jensenii after treatment for bacterial vaginosis: a cohort study.

Mitchell C, Manhart LE, Thomas K, Fiedler T, Fredricks DN, Marrazzo J - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2012)

Bottom Line: Presence of L. jensenii posttreatment was associated with cure (Risk Ratio (RR) 1.67; 95% CI 1.09-2.56); L. crispatus showed a similar trend (RR 1.41; 95% CI 0.89-2.24, P = 0.14).Receptive oral sex was associated with 2.2-log(10) lower concentration of L. crispatus (95% CI -4.38, -.02), and digital-vaginal sex with 2.6-log(10) lower concentration (95% CI -4.87, -.33).Few behaviors were associated with colonization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harborview Women's Clinic, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. camitch@u.w.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: Evaluate predictors of vaginal colonization with lactobacilli after treatment for bacterial vaginosis (BV).

Methods: Vaginal fluid specimens from women with BV underwent qPCR for Lactobacillus crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. iners pre- and posttreatment.

Results: Few women with BV were colonized with L. crispatus (4/44, 9%) or L. jensenii (1/44, 2%), though all had L. iners. One month posttreatment 12/44 (27%) had L. crispatus, 12/44 (27%) L. jensenii, and 43/44 (98%) L. iners. Presence of L. jensenii posttreatment was associated with cure (Risk Ratio (RR) 1.67; 95% CI 1.09-2.56); L. crispatus showed a similar trend (RR 1.41; 95% CI 0.89-2.24, P = 0.14). Receptive oral sex was associated with 2.2-log(10) lower concentration of L. crispatus (95% CI -4.38, -.02), and digital-vaginal sex with 2.6-log(10) lower concentration (95% CI -4.87, -.33).

Conclusion: One month after BV treatment, few women established colonization with L. crispatus or L. jensenii. Few behaviors were associated with colonization.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Change in concentrations of three different species of lactobacilli, as measured by species-specific quantitative PCR, 4 weeks after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with vaginal metronidazole. Each line represents an individual patient and her concentration of each bacterium before and after treatment. The dotted line represents the lower limit of detection of the qPCR assay.
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fig1: Change in concentrations of three different species of lactobacilli, as measured by species-specific quantitative PCR, 4 weeks after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with vaginal metronidazole. Each line represents an individual patient and her concentration of each bacterium before and after treatment. The dotted line represents the lower limit of detection of the qPCR assay.

Mentions: Of the four women colonized with L. crispatus at BV diagnosis, one achieved cure and had higher concentrations after treatment, while 3 failed treatment, and had lower (n = 2) or undetectable (n = 1) concentrations. The one woman colonized with L. jensenii at BV diagnosis no longer had detectable colonization after treatment, and also failed treatment (Figure 1). Among colonized women, mean Log10 concentration of L. crispatus after treatment was 6.1 ± 1.9 gene copies/mL and for L. jensenii was 6.0 ± .7 gene copies/mL. All 44 women were colonized with high quantities of L. iners at the BV diagnosis visit (mean Log10 copies 6.5 ± .9), and the quantity did not change significantly at the followup visit (mean Log10 copies 6.7 ± 1.1; P = .40).


Behavioral predictors of colonization with Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus jensenii after treatment for bacterial vaginosis: a cohort study.

Mitchell C, Manhart LE, Thomas K, Fiedler T, Fredricks DN, Marrazzo J - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2012)

Change in concentrations of three different species of lactobacilli, as measured by species-specific quantitative PCR, 4 weeks after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with vaginal metronidazole. Each line represents an individual patient and her concentration of each bacterium before and after treatment. The dotted line represents the lower limit of detection of the qPCR assay.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369434&req=5

fig1: Change in concentrations of three different species of lactobacilli, as measured by species-specific quantitative PCR, 4 weeks after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with vaginal metronidazole. Each line represents an individual patient and her concentration of each bacterium before and after treatment. The dotted line represents the lower limit of detection of the qPCR assay.
Mentions: Of the four women colonized with L. crispatus at BV diagnosis, one achieved cure and had higher concentrations after treatment, while 3 failed treatment, and had lower (n = 2) or undetectable (n = 1) concentrations. The one woman colonized with L. jensenii at BV diagnosis no longer had detectable colonization after treatment, and also failed treatment (Figure 1). Among colonized women, mean Log10 concentration of L. crispatus after treatment was 6.1 ± 1.9 gene copies/mL and for L. jensenii was 6.0 ± .7 gene copies/mL. All 44 women were colonized with high quantities of L. iners at the BV diagnosis visit (mean Log10 copies 6.5 ± .9), and the quantity did not change significantly at the followup visit (mean Log10 copies 6.7 ± 1.1; P = .40).

Bottom Line: Presence of L. jensenii posttreatment was associated with cure (Risk Ratio (RR) 1.67; 95% CI 1.09-2.56); L. crispatus showed a similar trend (RR 1.41; 95% CI 0.89-2.24, P = 0.14).Receptive oral sex was associated with 2.2-log(10) lower concentration of L. crispatus (95% CI -4.38, -.02), and digital-vaginal sex with 2.6-log(10) lower concentration (95% CI -4.87, -.33).Few behaviors were associated with colonization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harborview Women's Clinic, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. camitch@u.w.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: Evaluate predictors of vaginal colonization with lactobacilli after treatment for bacterial vaginosis (BV).

Methods: Vaginal fluid specimens from women with BV underwent qPCR for Lactobacillus crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. iners pre- and posttreatment.

Results: Few women with BV were colonized with L. crispatus (4/44, 9%) or L. jensenii (1/44, 2%), though all had L. iners. One month posttreatment 12/44 (27%) had L. crispatus, 12/44 (27%) L. jensenii, and 43/44 (98%) L. iners. Presence of L. jensenii posttreatment was associated with cure (Risk Ratio (RR) 1.67; 95% CI 1.09-2.56); L. crispatus showed a similar trend (RR 1.41; 95% CI 0.89-2.24, P = 0.14). Receptive oral sex was associated with 2.2-log(10) lower concentration of L. crispatus (95% CI -4.38, -.02), and digital-vaginal sex with 2.6-log(10) lower concentration (95% CI -4.87, -.33).

Conclusion: One month after BV treatment, few women established colonization with L. crispatus or L. jensenii. Few behaviors were associated with colonization.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus