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Unusual presentation of a metastatic esophageal carcinoma.

Orlicka K, Maynard S, Bouin M - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

Bottom Line: A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging.Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer.This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Esophageal cancer most commonly presents with upper digestive symptoms such as dysphagia. Lymph nodes are among the most common metastatic sites of this type of cancer. We report the case of a 53-year-old man presenting with unusual sole presenting features of esophageal cancer. The patient sought medical attention for abdominal pain without dysphagia, which was first investigated with an abdominal computed tomography scan. A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging. Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer. With this finding, gastroscopy was performed, confirming the presence of primary esophageal cancer. This is a rare presentation of esophageal cancer without upper gastrointestinal symptoms. This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gastroscopy showing the suspicious lesion at the mid third of the esophagus.
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Figure 3: Gastroscopy showing the suspicious lesion at the mid third of the esophagus.

Mentions: With these findings, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed. It revealed a non-ulcerated suspicious lesion at the mid third of the esophagus, without stenosis (fig. 3). The diagnosis of infiltrative and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed by histology, special colorations (MowrieD and mucicarmin) and immunohistochemical markers (p63, CK5–6). The patient refused surgery or chemotherapy. He was referred for palliative radiotherapy for pain management.


Unusual presentation of a metastatic esophageal carcinoma.

Orlicka K, Maynard S, Bouin M - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

Gastroscopy showing the suspicious lesion at the mid third of the esophagus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369420&req=5

Figure 3: Gastroscopy showing the suspicious lesion at the mid third of the esophagus.
Mentions: With these findings, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed. It revealed a non-ulcerated suspicious lesion at the mid third of the esophagus, without stenosis (fig. 3). The diagnosis of infiltrative and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed by histology, special colorations (MowrieD and mucicarmin) and immunohistochemical markers (p63, CK5–6). The patient refused surgery or chemotherapy. He was referred for palliative radiotherapy for pain management.

Bottom Line: A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging.Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer.This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Esophageal cancer most commonly presents with upper digestive symptoms such as dysphagia. Lymph nodes are among the most common metastatic sites of this type of cancer. We report the case of a 53-year-old man presenting with unusual sole presenting features of esophageal cancer. The patient sought medical attention for abdominal pain without dysphagia, which was first investigated with an abdominal computed tomography scan. A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging. Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer. With this finding, gastroscopy was performed, confirming the presence of primary esophageal cancer. This is a rare presentation of esophageal cancer without upper gastrointestinal symptoms. This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus