Limits...
Unusual presentation of a metastatic esophageal carcinoma.

Orlicka K, Maynard S, Bouin M - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

Bottom Line: A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging.Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer.This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Esophageal cancer most commonly presents with upper digestive symptoms such as dysphagia. Lymph nodes are among the most common metastatic sites of this type of cancer. We report the case of a 53-year-old man presenting with unusual sole presenting features of esophageal cancer. The patient sought medical attention for abdominal pain without dysphagia, which was first investigated with an abdominal computed tomography scan. A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging. Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer. With this finding, gastroscopy was performed, confirming the presence of primary esophageal cancer. This is a rare presentation of esophageal cancer without upper gastrointestinal symptoms. This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT scanning showing the heterogeneous mass localized beneath the pancreatic gland.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369420&req=5

Figure 1: CT scanning showing the heterogeneous mass localized beneath the pancreatic gland.

Mentions: A CT scan revealed a heterogeneous lesion with necrotic tissue localized beneath the pancreatic gland, at the mesenteric root (fig. 1). The mass was pushing the pancreas forward and was invading vascular structures of the celiac trunk and the superior mesenteric artery. Some retroperitoneal suspicious lymph nodes were also noted. The rest of the CT was within normal limits, including the renal and urinary systems. It was impossible for the radiologists to determine the exact origin of this tumor on imaging.


Unusual presentation of a metastatic esophageal carcinoma.

Orlicka K, Maynard S, Bouin M - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

CT scanning showing the heterogeneous mass localized beneath the pancreatic gland.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369420&req=5

Figure 1: CT scanning showing the heterogeneous mass localized beneath the pancreatic gland.
Mentions: A CT scan revealed a heterogeneous lesion with necrotic tissue localized beneath the pancreatic gland, at the mesenteric root (fig. 1). The mass was pushing the pancreas forward and was invading vascular structures of the celiac trunk and the superior mesenteric artery. Some retroperitoneal suspicious lymph nodes were also noted. The rest of the CT was within normal limits, including the renal and urinary systems. It was impossible for the radiologists to determine the exact origin of this tumor on imaging.

Bottom Line: A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging.Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer.This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Esophageal cancer most commonly presents with upper digestive symptoms such as dysphagia. Lymph nodes are among the most common metastatic sites of this type of cancer. We report the case of a 53-year-old man presenting with unusual sole presenting features of esophageal cancer. The patient sought medical attention for abdominal pain without dysphagia, which was first investigated with an abdominal computed tomography scan. A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging. Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer. With this finding, gastroscopy was performed, confirming the presence of primary esophageal cancer. This is a rare presentation of esophageal cancer without upper gastrointestinal symptoms. This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus