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Metal allergy and systemic contact dermatitis: an overview.

Yoshihisa Y, Shimizu T - Dermatol Res Pract (2012)

Bottom Line: Metal allergy may result in allergic contact dermatitis and also SCD.In vitro tests, such as the lymphocyte stimulating test (LST), have some advantages over patch testing to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis.Additionally, the determination of the production of several cytokines by primary peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures is a potentially promising in vitro method for the discrimination of metal allergies, including SCD, as compared with the LST.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Contact dermatitis is produced by external skin exposure to an allergen, but sometimes a systemically administered allergen may reach the skin and remain concentrated there with the aid of the circulatory system, leading to the production of systemic contact dermatitis (SCD). Metals such as nickel, cobalt, chromium, and zinc are ubiquitous in our environment. Metal allergy may result in allergic contact dermatitis and also SCD. Systemic reactions, such as hand dermatitis or generalized eczematous reactions, can occur due to dietary nickel or cobalt ingestion. Zinc-containing dental fillings can induce oral lichen planus, palmoplantar pustulosis, and maculopapular rash. A diagnosis of sensitivity to metal is established by epicutaneous patch testing and oral metal challenge with metals such as nickel, cobalt, chromium, and zinc. In vitro tests, such as the lymphocyte stimulating test (LST), have some advantages over patch testing to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis. Additionally, the determination of the production of several cytokines by primary peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures is a potentially promising in vitro method for the discrimination of metal allergies, including SCD, as compared with the LST.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) A 49-year-old Japanese female with a diffuse edematous erythema with papules over her entire body. (b) The oral challenge test with zinc sulfate caused exacerbation of the preexisting eruptions on her palms, including itching edematous erythema.
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fig1: (a) A 49-year-old Japanese female with a diffuse edematous erythema with papules over her entire body. (b) The oral challenge test with zinc sulfate caused exacerbation of the preexisting eruptions on her palms, including itching edematous erythema.

Mentions: Zinc is an essential trace element involved in many physiological functions, including catalytic and structural roles in metalloenzymes, as well as regulatory roles in diverse cellular processes, such as synaptic signaling and gene expression. Zinc is widely used in dental restoration. The previously reported dental metal eruptions caused by zinc have included oral lichen planus [34], palmoplantar pustulosis [35], and a maculopapular rash [36]. It has also been reported to cause severe symptoms in cases of SCD. One case was a 49-year-old Japanese female who developed facial edema, blepharedema, and pruritic edematous erythema with papules over her entire body. Based on the results of a metal patch test, lymphocyte stimulating test (LST), and zinc challenge test, a diagnosis of zinc-allergic SCD was made (Figure 1) [37]. This case had four teeth that had been treated with metal fillings, which likely contained zinc. All of the patient's dental fillings were completely removed, and her diet was changed to a zinc-restricted diet. Two weeks later, the majority of the skin lesions, which had lasted for four months, subsided rapidly [37].


Metal allergy and systemic contact dermatitis: an overview.

Yoshihisa Y, Shimizu T - Dermatol Res Pract (2012)

(a) A 49-year-old Japanese female with a diffuse edematous erythema with papules over her entire body. (b) The oral challenge test with zinc sulfate caused exacerbation of the preexisting eruptions on her palms, including itching edematous erythema.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369403&req=5

fig1: (a) A 49-year-old Japanese female with a diffuse edematous erythema with papules over her entire body. (b) The oral challenge test with zinc sulfate caused exacerbation of the preexisting eruptions on her palms, including itching edematous erythema.
Mentions: Zinc is an essential trace element involved in many physiological functions, including catalytic and structural roles in metalloenzymes, as well as regulatory roles in diverse cellular processes, such as synaptic signaling and gene expression. Zinc is widely used in dental restoration. The previously reported dental metal eruptions caused by zinc have included oral lichen planus [34], palmoplantar pustulosis [35], and a maculopapular rash [36]. It has also been reported to cause severe symptoms in cases of SCD. One case was a 49-year-old Japanese female who developed facial edema, blepharedema, and pruritic edematous erythema with papules over her entire body. Based on the results of a metal patch test, lymphocyte stimulating test (LST), and zinc challenge test, a diagnosis of zinc-allergic SCD was made (Figure 1) [37]. This case had four teeth that had been treated with metal fillings, which likely contained zinc. All of the patient's dental fillings were completely removed, and her diet was changed to a zinc-restricted diet. Two weeks later, the majority of the skin lesions, which had lasted for four months, subsided rapidly [37].

Bottom Line: Metal allergy may result in allergic contact dermatitis and also SCD.In vitro tests, such as the lymphocyte stimulating test (LST), have some advantages over patch testing to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis.Additionally, the determination of the production of several cytokines by primary peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures is a potentially promising in vitro method for the discrimination of metal allergies, including SCD, as compared with the LST.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Contact dermatitis is produced by external skin exposure to an allergen, but sometimes a systemically administered allergen may reach the skin and remain concentrated there with the aid of the circulatory system, leading to the production of systemic contact dermatitis (SCD). Metals such as nickel, cobalt, chromium, and zinc are ubiquitous in our environment. Metal allergy may result in allergic contact dermatitis and also SCD. Systemic reactions, such as hand dermatitis or generalized eczematous reactions, can occur due to dietary nickel or cobalt ingestion. Zinc-containing dental fillings can induce oral lichen planus, palmoplantar pustulosis, and maculopapular rash. A diagnosis of sensitivity to metal is established by epicutaneous patch testing and oral metal challenge with metals such as nickel, cobalt, chromium, and zinc. In vitro tests, such as the lymphocyte stimulating test (LST), have some advantages over patch testing to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis. Additionally, the determination of the production of several cytokines by primary peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures is a potentially promising in vitro method for the discrimination of metal allergies, including SCD, as compared with the LST.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus