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Ectopic Sebaceous Glands in the Esophagus: Endoscopic Findings over Three Years.

Fukuchi M, Tsukagoshi R, Sakurai S, Kiriyama S, Horiuchi K, Yuasa K, Suzuki M, Yamauchi H, Tabe Y, Fukasawa T, Naitoh H, Kuwano H - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

Bottom Line: We report a case with ectopic sebaceous glands diagnosed by esophageal endoscopy and biopsy, with follow-up endoscopic examinations for 3 years.In our case, there were no significant overall changes during 3 years of follow-up, but the lesions fluctuated over time.While taking the endoscopic findings of the present or past cases into account, we discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms of this condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Sebaceous glands in the esophagus are rare and are of particular interest because of their as yet unknown origin. We report a case with ectopic sebaceous glands diagnosed by esophageal endoscopy and biopsy, with follow-up endoscopic examinations for 3 years. Few cases with follow-up endoscopic findings have been reported. In our case, there were no significant overall changes during 3 years of follow-up, but the lesions fluctuated over time. While taking the endoscopic findings of the present or past cases into account, we discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms of this condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Endoscopic examination. a First endoscopic examination: More than 100 yellowish plaques measuring 1–20 mm in diameter were seen in the middle and lower thoracic esophagus. The lobulated flower-like lesions were scattered over the mucosal surface. b Endoscopic examination after 1 year: The lesions had decreased slightly in size or number compared with the first examination. c Endoscopic examination after 2 years: The lesions had decreased further in size or number compared with the first examination. d Endoscopic examination after 3 years: The lesions had increased in size or number again and were similar to the first examination.
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Figure 1: Endoscopic examination. a First endoscopic examination: More than 100 yellowish plaques measuring 1–20 mm in diameter were seen in the middle and lower thoracic esophagus. The lobulated flower-like lesions were scattered over the mucosal surface. b Endoscopic examination after 1 year: The lesions had decreased slightly in size or number compared with the first examination. c Endoscopic examination after 2 years: The lesions had decreased further in size or number compared with the first examination. d Endoscopic examination after 3 years: The lesions had increased in size or number again and were similar to the first examination.

Mentions: Endoscopic examination revealed more than 100 yellowish plaques 1–20 mm in diameter scattered over the mucosal surface of the middle and lower thoracic esophagus (fig. 1a). The smaller lesions had a fine, granular appearance and the larger lesions had lobulated margins, giving them a flower-like appearance. Biopsy specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) showed sebaceous glands associated with lymphocytic infiltration and an excretory duct, and overlying squamous epithelium (fig. 2). No evidence of hair follicles or malignancy was noted.


Ectopic Sebaceous Glands in the Esophagus: Endoscopic Findings over Three Years.

Fukuchi M, Tsukagoshi R, Sakurai S, Kiriyama S, Horiuchi K, Yuasa K, Suzuki M, Yamauchi H, Tabe Y, Fukasawa T, Naitoh H, Kuwano H - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

Endoscopic examination. a First endoscopic examination: More than 100 yellowish plaques measuring 1–20 mm in diameter were seen in the middle and lower thoracic esophagus. The lobulated flower-like lesions were scattered over the mucosal surface. b Endoscopic examination after 1 year: The lesions had decreased slightly in size or number compared with the first examination. c Endoscopic examination after 2 years: The lesions had decreased further in size or number compared with the first examination. d Endoscopic examination after 3 years: The lesions had increased in size or number again and were similar to the first examination.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369260&req=5

Figure 1: Endoscopic examination. a First endoscopic examination: More than 100 yellowish plaques measuring 1–20 mm in diameter were seen in the middle and lower thoracic esophagus. The lobulated flower-like lesions were scattered over the mucosal surface. b Endoscopic examination after 1 year: The lesions had decreased slightly in size or number compared with the first examination. c Endoscopic examination after 2 years: The lesions had decreased further in size or number compared with the first examination. d Endoscopic examination after 3 years: The lesions had increased in size or number again and were similar to the first examination.
Mentions: Endoscopic examination revealed more than 100 yellowish plaques 1–20 mm in diameter scattered over the mucosal surface of the middle and lower thoracic esophagus (fig. 1a). The smaller lesions had a fine, granular appearance and the larger lesions had lobulated margins, giving them a flower-like appearance. Biopsy specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) showed sebaceous glands associated with lymphocytic infiltration and an excretory duct, and overlying squamous epithelium (fig. 2). No evidence of hair follicles or malignancy was noted.

Bottom Line: We report a case with ectopic sebaceous glands diagnosed by esophageal endoscopy and biopsy, with follow-up endoscopic examinations for 3 years.In our case, there were no significant overall changes during 3 years of follow-up, but the lesions fluctuated over time.While taking the endoscopic findings of the present or past cases into account, we discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms of this condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Sebaceous glands in the esophagus are rare and are of particular interest because of their as yet unknown origin. We report a case with ectopic sebaceous glands diagnosed by esophageal endoscopy and biopsy, with follow-up endoscopic examinations for 3 years. Few cases with follow-up endoscopic findings have been reported. In our case, there were no significant overall changes during 3 years of follow-up, but the lesions fluctuated over time. While taking the endoscopic findings of the present or past cases into account, we discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms of this condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus