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Possible cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus between co-grazing sheep and cattle.

Rogdo T, Hektoen L, Slettemeås JS, Jørgensen HJ, Østerås O, Fjeldaas T - Acta Vet. Scand. (2012)

Bottom Line: All the D. nodosus serogroups detected in sheep were also present in the corresponding cattle herds.The clinical findings and the coexistence of the same serogroups in co-grazing sheep and cattle could indicate cross-infection.However, further research including isolation of the bacterial strains, virulence-testing and genetic identification, is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Kyrkjevn 332/334, Sandnes 4325, Norway. torunn.rogdo@nvh.no

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate possible cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus in Norwegian farms practising co-grazing of sheep and cattle.

Methods: Thirteen farms practising co-grazing of sheep and cattle were included in this descriptive study: five farms with a history of severe ovine footrot (Group I) and eight farms with free-stall housing of cattle and signs of mild or no footrot in sheep (Group II). Sampling for PCR detection of D. nodosus was performed from animals in all farms, and clinical claw examination of sheep and cattle was performed in Group II. D. nodosus positive samples were analysed by a multiplex PCR method that detects variants of the fimA gene corresponding to D. nodosus serogroups A through I.

Results: D. nodosus serogroup A was identified more frequently in sheep from farms with a history of severe footrot (Group I) versus from Group II, and in most of the farms with a history of severe footrot there was a coexistence of D. nodosus serogroup A in sheep and cattle. In one farm heel horn erosion and dermatitis emerged in cattle after co-grazing with sheep suffering from severe footrot where D. nodosus serogroup A was detected. Six months later heel horn erosion and dermatitis were still diagnosed, and D. nodosus serogroup A was identified. Out of the 16 D. nodosus positive sheep samples from Group II, ten of the samples were positive by the fimA serogrouping PCR. Among these 10 samples all serogroups except G were detected. All the D. nodosus serogroups detected in sheep were also present in the corresponding cattle herds.

Conclusion: The clinical findings and the coexistence of the same serogroups in co-grazing sheep and cattle could indicate cross-infection. However, further research including isolation of the bacterial strains, virulence-testing and genetic identification, is needed.

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Events in farm 5 indicating cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus from sheep with severe footrot to cattle co-grazing at pasture.
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Figure 2: Events in farm 5 indicating cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus from sheep with severe footrot to cattle co-grazing at pasture.

Mentions: In Group I samples from 43 sheep were taken during the summer of 2008. The samples from 58 cattle were taken during the winter/spring of 2008/2009. The cows in farms 1 and 5 were sampled an additional time in order to follow the events in these farms as depicted in Figure 1 and 2. A total of 88 samples were taken from cattle in Group I. A sterile wooden stick was used to scrape the interdigital area, and the stick was subsequently placed in Peptone Buffered Saline (PBS) containing EDTA. The sheep samples were collected from the feet with clinical symptoms, whereas the cow samples were always collected from the right hind foot. They were sent to the laboratory by mail. The samples were taken without systematic clinical recording of claw disorders, but information on chronological events regarding claw health in these farms between January 2008 and April 2009 was gathered from the Norwegian Sheep Health Service and from telephone conversations with the farmers.


Possible cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus between co-grazing sheep and cattle.

Rogdo T, Hektoen L, Slettemeås JS, Jørgensen HJ, Østerås O, Fjeldaas T - Acta Vet. Scand. (2012)

Events in farm 5 indicating cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus from sheep with severe footrot to cattle co-grazing at pasture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369200&req=5

Figure 2: Events in farm 5 indicating cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus from sheep with severe footrot to cattle co-grazing at pasture.
Mentions: In Group I samples from 43 sheep were taken during the summer of 2008. The samples from 58 cattle were taken during the winter/spring of 2008/2009. The cows in farms 1 and 5 were sampled an additional time in order to follow the events in these farms as depicted in Figure 1 and 2. A total of 88 samples were taken from cattle in Group I. A sterile wooden stick was used to scrape the interdigital area, and the stick was subsequently placed in Peptone Buffered Saline (PBS) containing EDTA. The sheep samples were collected from the feet with clinical symptoms, whereas the cow samples were always collected from the right hind foot. They were sent to the laboratory by mail. The samples were taken without systematic clinical recording of claw disorders, but information on chronological events regarding claw health in these farms between January 2008 and April 2009 was gathered from the Norwegian Sheep Health Service and from telephone conversations with the farmers.

Bottom Line: All the D. nodosus serogroups detected in sheep were also present in the corresponding cattle herds.The clinical findings and the coexistence of the same serogroups in co-grazing sheep and cattle could indicate cross-infection.However, further research including isolation of the bacterial strains, virulence-testing and genetic identification, is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Kyrkjevn 332/334, Sandnes 4325, Norway. torunn.rogdo@nvh.no

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate possible cross-infection of Dichelobacter nodosus in Norwegian farms practising co-grazing of sheep and cattle.

Methods: Thirteen farms practising co-grazing of sheep and cattle were included in this descriptive study: five farms with a history of severe ovine footrot (Group I) and eight farms with free-stall housing of cattle and signs of mild or no footrot in sheep (Group II). Sampling for PCR detection of D. nodosus was performed from animals in all farms, and clinical claw examination of sheep and cattle was performed in Group II. D. nodosus positive samples were analysed by a multiplex PCR method that detects variants of the fimA gene corresponding to D. nodosus serogroups A through I.

Results: D. nodosus serogroup A was identified more frequently in sheep from farms with a history of severe footrot (Group I) versus from Group II, and in most of the farms with a history of severe footrot there was a coexistence of D. nodosus serogroup A in sheep and cattle. In one farm heel horn erosion and dermatitis emerged in cattle after co-grazing with sheep suffering from severe footrot where D. nodosus serogroup A was detected. Six months later heel horn erosion and dermatitis were still diagnosed, and D. nodosus serogroup A was identified. Out of the 16 D. nodosus positive sheep samples from Group II, ten of the samples were positive by the fimA serogrouping PCR. Among these 10 samples all serogroups except G were detected. All the D. nodosus serogroups detected in sheep were also present in the corresponding cattle herds.

Conclusion: The clinical findings and the coexistence of the same serogroups in co-grazing sheep and cattle could indicate cross-infection. However, further research including isolation of the bacterial strains, virulence-testing and genetic identification, is needed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus