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Physical activity reduces the risk of incident type 2 diabetes in general and in abdominally lean and obese men and women: the EPIC-InterAct Study.

InterAct ConsortiumEkelund U, Palla L, Brage S, Franks PW, Peters T, Balkau B, Diaz MJ, Huerta JM, Agnoli C, Arriola L, Ardanaz E, Boeing H, Clavel-Chapelon F, Crowe F, Fagherazzi G, Groop L, Føns Johnsen N, Kaaks R, Khaw KT, Key TJ, de Lauzon-Guillain B, May A, Monninkhof E, Navarro C, Nilsson P, Nautrup Østergaard J, Norat T, Overvad K, Palli D, Panico S, Redondo ML, Ricceri F, Rolandsson O, Romaguera D, Romieu I, Sánchez Pérez MJ, Slimani N, Spijkerman A, Teucher B, Tjonneland A, Travier N, Tumino R, Vos W, Vigl M, Sharp S, Langeberg C, Forouhi N, Riboli E, Feskens E, Wareham NJ - Diabetologia (2012)

Bottom Line: A one-category difference in physical activity (equivalent to approximately 460 and 365 kJ/day in men and women, respectively) was independently associated with a 13% (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80, 0.94) and 7% (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89, 0.98) relative reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women, respectively.Comparing inactive with active individuals, the HRs were 1.44 (95% CI 1.11, 1.87) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.17, 1.62) in abdominally lean and obese inactive men, respectively, and 1.57 (95% CI 1.19, 2.07) and 1.19 (95% CI 1.01, 1.39) in abdominally lean and obese inactive women, respectively.Physical activity is associated with a reduction in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes across BMI categories in men and women, as well as in abdominally lean and obese men and women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aims/hypothesis: We examined the independent and combined associations of physical activity and obesity with incident type 2 diabetes in men and women.

Methods: The InterAct case-cohort study consists of 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a randomly selected subcohort of 16,154 individuals, drawn from a total cohort of 340,234 participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up. Physical activity was assessed by a four-category index. Obesity was measured by BMI and waist circumference (WC). Associations between physical activity, obesity and case-ascertained incident type 2 diabetes were analysed by Cox regression after adjusting for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake. In combined analyses, individuals were stratified according to physical activity level, BMI and WC.

Results: A one-category difference in physical activity (equivalent to approximately 460 and 365 kJ/day in men and women, respectively) was independently associated with a 13% (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80, 0.94) and 7% (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89, 0.98) relative reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women, respectively. Lower levels of physical activity were associated with an increased risk of diabetes across all strata of BMI. Comparing inactive with active individuals, the HRs were 1.44 (95% CI 1.11, 1.87) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.17, 1.62) in abdominally lean and obese inactive men, respectively, and 1.57 (95% CI 1.19, 2.07) and 1.19 (95% CI 1.01, 1.39) in abdominally lean and obese inactive women, respectively.

Conclusions/interpretation: Physical activity is associated with a reduction in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes across BMI categories in men and women, as well as in abdominally lean and obese men and women.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

HR (95% CIs) of incident diabetes per one-level difference in physical activity (a) men and (b) women. Models are adjusted for baseline WC, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake
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Fig2: HR (95% CIs) of incident diabetes per one-level difference in physical activity (a) men and (b) women. Models are adjusted for baseline WC, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake

Mentions: Table 1 describes the characteristics of randomly selected subcohort participants stratified by sex and categories of physical activity. Figure 1 shows the estimated HRs and 95% CIs of incident diabetes per one category difference in physical activity in men (Fig. 1a) and women (Fig. 1b). After adjustment for study centre, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, energy intake and BMI, a one level difference in physical activity (e.g. between inactive and moderately inactive) was associated with a 13% relative reduction in risk of incident type 2 diabetes in men and a 7% risk reduction in women (Fig. 1a, b). We thereafter substituted BMI by WC as a confounding variable; the effects were then slightly attenuated in men (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.86, 1.00), but unchanged in women (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89, 0.98) (Fig. 2a, b).Table 1


Physical activity reduces the risk of incident type 2 diabetes in general and in abdominally lean and obese men and women: the EPIC-InterAct Study.

InterAct ConsortiumEkelund U, Palla L, Brage S, Franks PW, Peters T, Balkau B, Diaz MJ, Huerta JM, Agnoli C, Arriola L, Ardanaz E, Boeing H, Clavel-Chapelon F, Crowe F, Fagherazzi G, Groop L, Føns Johnsen N, Kaaks R, Khaw KT, Key TJ, de Lauzon-Guillain B, May A, Monninkhof E, Navarro C, Nilsson P, Nautrup Østergaard J, Norat T, Overvad K, Palli D, Panico S, Redondo ML, Ricceri F, Rolandsson O, Romaguera D, Romieu I, Sánchez Pérez MJ, Slimani N, Spijkerman A, Teucher B, Tjonneland A, Travier N, Tumino R, Vos W, Vigl M, Sharp S, Langeberg C, Forouhi N, Riboli E, Feskens E, Wareham NJ - Diabetologia (2012)

HR (95% CIs) of incident diabetes per one-level difference in physical activity (a) men and (b) women. Models are adjusted for baseline WC, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369127&req=5

Fig2: HR (95% CIs) of incident diabetes per one-level difference in physical activity (a) men and (b) women. Models are adjusted for baseline WC, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake
Mentions: Table 1 describes the characteristics of randomly selected subcohort participants stratified by sex and categories of physical activity. Figure 1 shows the estimated HRs and 95% CIs of incident diabetes per one category difference in physical activity in men (Fig. 1a) and women (Fig. 1b). After adjustment for study centre, education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, energy intake and BMI, a one level difference in physical activity (e.g. between inactive and moderately inactive) was associated with a 13% relative reduction in risk of incident type 2 diabetes in men and a 7% risk reduction in women (Fig. 1a, b). We thereafter substituted BMI by WC as a confounding variable; the effects were then slightly attenuated in men (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.86, 1.00), but unchanged in women (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89, 0.98) (Fig. 2a, b).Table 1

Bottom Line: A one-category difference in physical activity (equivalent to approximately 460 and 365 kJ/day in men and women, respectively) was independently associated with a 13% (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80, 0.94) and 7% (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89, 0.98) relative reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women, respectively.Comparing inactive with active individuals, the HRs were 1.44 (95% CI 1.11, 1.87) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.17, 1.62) in abdominally lean and obese inactive men, respectively, and 1.57 (95% CI 1.19, 2.07) and 1.19 (95% CI 1.01, 1.39) in abdominally lean and obese inactive women, respectively.Physical activity is associated with a reduction in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes across BMI categories in men and women, as well as in abdominally lean and obese men and women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aims/hypothesis: We examined the independent and combined associations of physical activity and obesity with incident type 2 diabetes in men and women.

Methods: The InterAct case-cohort study consists of 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a randomly selected subcohort of 16,154 individuals, drawn from a total cohort of 340,234 participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up. Physical activity was assessed by a four-category index. Obesity was measured by BMI and waist circumference (WC). Associations between physical activity, obesity and case-ascertained incident type 2 diabetes were analysed by Cox regression after adjusting for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake. In combined analyses, individuals were stratified according to physical activity level, BMI and WC.

Results: A one-category difference in physical activity (equivalent to approximately 460 and 365 kJ/day in men and women, respectively) was independently associated with a 13% (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80, 0.94) and 7% (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89, 0.98) relative reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women, respectively. Lower levels of physical activity were associated with an increased risk of diabetes across all strata of BMI. Comparing inactive with active individuals, the HRs were 1.44 (95% CI 1.11, 1.87) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.17, 1.62) in abdominally lean and obese inactive men, respectively, and 1.57 (95% CI 1.19, 2.07) and 1.19 (95% CI 1.01, 1.39) in abdominally lean and obese inactive women, respectively.

Conclusions/interpretation: Physical activity is associated with a reduction in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes across BMI categories in men and women, as well as in abdominally lean and obese men and women.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus