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Fetal MR in the evaluation of pulmonary and digestive system pathology.

Martin C, Darnell A, Escofet C, Duran C, Pérez V - Insights Imaging (2012)

Bottom Line: Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common.As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study. • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, UDIAT CD, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Prenatal awareness of an anomaly ensures better management of the pregnant patient, enables medical teams and parents to prepare for the delivery, and is very useful for making decisions about postnatal treatment. Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common. As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.

Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables excellent discrimination among tissues, making it a useful adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in the study of fetal morphology and pathology.

Results: MRI is most useful when US has detected or suspected anomalies, and more anomalies are detected when MRI and US findings are assessed together.

Conclusion: We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study.

Teaching points: • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula. Fetus at 33 weeks’ gestation. MR was indicated for US findings of renal ectopia or horseshoe kidney. a and b Sagittal single-shot fast spin-echo MR images of the fetus. MR detected left renal agenesis and ectopia of the right kidney (arrow in a). A pouch was detected in the upper esophagus (arrow in b). There was polyhydramnios, and the stomach was small. c and d CT after birth showing the atresia and the tracheoesophageal fistula (arrow in d), T trachea, E esophagus
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Fig8: Esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula. Fetus at 33 weeks’ gestation. MR was indicated for US findings of renal ectopia or horseshoe kidney. a and b Sagittal single-shot fast spin-echo MR images of the fetus. MR detected left renal agenesis and ectopia of the right kidney (arrow in a). A pouch was detected in the upper esophagus (arrow in b). There was polyhydramnios, and the stomach was small. c and d CT after birth showing the atresia and the tracheoesophageal fistula (arrow in d), T trachea, E esophagus

Mentions: MRI findings are polyhydramnios and absent or very small stomach. However, a small stomach may be a normal finding or may have other causes (deglution disorders, facial defects, cervicofacial tumors, CNS lesions, oligohydramnios, etc.). Occasionally the proximal segment of the esophagus can be seen as a hyperintense pouch in T2-weighted sequences, especially in sagittal images along the midline of the fetal thorax [13, 14] (Fig. 8). Tracheoesophageal fistulas are not normally seen on MRI.Fig. 8


Fetal MR in the evaluation of pulmonary and digestive system pathology.

Martin C, Darnell A, Escofet C, Duran C, Pérez V - Insights Imaging (2012)

Esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula. Fetus at 33 weeks’ gestation. MR was indicated for US findings of renal ectopia or horseshoe kidney. a and b Sagittal single-shot fast spin-echo MR images of the fetus. MR detected left renal agenesis and ectopia of the right kidney (arrow in a). A pouch was detected in the upper esophagus (arrow in b). There was polyhydramnios, and the stomach was small. c and d CT after birth showing the atresia and the tracheoesophageal fistula (arrow in d), T trachea, E esophagus
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369121&req=5

Fig8: Esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula. Fetus at 33 weeks’ gestation. MR was indicated for US findings of renal ectopia or horseshoe kidney. a and b Sagittal single-shot fast spin-echo MR images of the fetus. MR detected left renal agenesis and ectopia of the right kidney (arrow in a). A pouch was detected in the upper esophagus (arrow in b). There was polyhydramnios, and the stomach was small. c and d CT after birth showing the atresia and the tracheoesophageal fistula (arrow in d), T trachea, E esophagus
Mentions: MRI findings are polyhydramnios and absent or very small stomach. However, a small stomach may be a normal finding or may have other causes (deglution disorders, facial defects, cervicofacial tumors, CNS lesions, oligohydramnios, etc.). Occasionally the proximal segment of the esophagus can be seen as a hyperintense pouch in T2-weighted sequences, especially in sagittal images along the midline of the fetal thorax [13, 14] (Fig. 8). Tracheoesophageal fistulas are not normally seen on MRI.Fig. 8

Bottom Line: Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common.As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study. • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, UDIAT CD, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Prenatal awareness of an anomaly ensures better management of the pregnant patient, enables medical teams and parents to prepare for the delivery, and is very useful for making decisions about postnatal treatment. Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common. As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.

Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables excellent discrimination among tissues, making it a useful adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in the study of fetal morphology and pathology.

Results: MRI is most useful when US has detected or suspected anomalies, and more anomalies are detected when MRI and US findings are assessed together.

Conclusion: We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study.

Teaching points: • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus