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Fetal MR in the evaluation of pulmonary and digestive system pathology.

Martin C, Darnell A, Escofet C, Duran C, Pérez V - Insights Imaging (2012)

Bottom Line: Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common.As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study. • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, UDIAT CD, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Prenatal awareness of an anomaly ensures better management of the pregnant patient, enables medical teams and parents to prepare for the delivery, and is very useful for making decisions about postnatal treatment. Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common. As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.

Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables excellent discrimination among tissues, making it a useful adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in the study of fetal morphology and pathology.

Results: MRI is most useful when US has detected or suspected anomalies, and more anomalies are detected when MRI and US findings are assessed together.

Conclusion: We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study.

Teaching points: • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gastroschisis. Fetus at 19 weeks’ gestation. a Fetal axial single-shot fast spin-echo MR image showing a large portion of the intestinal loops outside the abdominal cavity (arrowhead). There is no peritoneal lining, and the umbilical cord is inserted in the correct position (arrow). The liver and the stomach are within the abdomen. b Photograph of the patient after birth showing the intestinal loops outside of the abdominal cavity and the umbilical cord (arrow) inserted in the correct position
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Fig19: Gastroschisis. Fetus at 19 weeks’ gestation. a Fetal axial single-shot fast spin-echo MR image showing a large portion of the intestinal loops outside the abdominal cavity (arrowhead). There is no peritoneal lining, and the umbilical cord is inserted in the correct position (arrow). The liver and the stomach are within the abdomen. b Photograph of the patient after birth showing the intestinal loops outside of the abdominal cavity and the umbilical cord (arrow) inserted in the correct position

Mentions: MRI easily detects the evisceration of abdominal structures [29, 30]. T2-weighted sequences are the most useful because the abdominal structures located outside the abdominal cavity are clearly visualized against the hyperintense amniotic fluid (Fig. 19). The axial plane is best to show the defect in the abdominal wall and the position of the umbilical cord. T1-weighted sequences are useful for determining the position of the large intestine. Volumetric images can be helpful in determining whether the eviscerated organs have a peritoneal lining and the site of umbilical cord insertion. These two findings are important in differentiating gastroschisis from omphalocele (Fig. 20).Fig. 19


Fetal MR in the evaluation of pulmonary and digestive system pathology.

Martin C, Darnell A, Escofet C, Duran C, Pérez V - Insights Imaging (2012)

Gastroschisis. Fetus at 19 weeks’ gestation. a Fetal axial single-shot fast spin-echo MR image showing a large portion of the intestinal loops outside the abdominal cavity (arrowhead). There is no peritoneal lining, and the umbilical cord is inserted in the correct position (arrow). The liver and the stomach are within the abdomen. b Photograph of the patient after birth showing the intestinal loops outside of the abdominal cavity and the umbilical cord (arrow) inserted in the correct position
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369121&req=5

Fig19: Gastroschisis. Fetus at 19 weeks’ gestation. a Fetal axial single-shot fast spin-echo MR image showing a large portion of the intestinal loops outside the abdominal cavity (arrowhead). There is no peritoneal lining, and the umbilical cord is inserted in the correct position (arrow). The liver and the stomach are within the abdomen. b Photograph of the patient after birth showing the intestinal loops outside of the abdominal cavity and the umbilical cord (arrow) inserted in the correct position
Mentions: MRI easily detects the evisceration of abdominal structures [29, 30]. T2-weighted sequences are the most useful because the abdominal structures located outside the abdominal cavity are clearly visualized against the hyperintense amniotic fluid (Fig. 19). The axial plane is best to show the defect in the abdominal wall and the position of the umbilical cord. T1-weighted sequences are useful for determining the position of the large intestine. Volumetric images can be helpful in determining whether the eviscerated organs have a peritoneal lining and the site of umbilical cord insertion. These two findings are important in differentiating gastroschisis from omphalocele (Fig. 20).Fig. 19

Bottom Line: Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common.As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study. • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, UDIAT CD, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Prenatal awareness of an anomaly ensures better management of the pregnant patient, enables medical teams and parents to prepare for the delivery, and is very useful for making decisions about postnatal treatment. Congenital malformations of the thorax, abdomen, and gastrointestinal tract are common. As various organs can be affected, accurate location and morphological characterization are important for accurate diagnosis.

Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables excellent discrimination among tissues, making it a useful adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in the study of fetal morphology and pathology.

Results: MRI is most useful when US has detected or suspected anomalies, and more anomalies are detected when MRI and US findings are assessed together.

Conclusion: We describe the normal appearance of fetal thoracic, abdominal, and gastrointestinal structures on MRI, and we discuss the most common anomalies involving these structures and the role of MRI in their study.

Teaching points: • To learn about the normal anatomy of the fetal chest, abdomen, and GI tract on MRI. • To recognize the MR appearance of congenital anomalies of the lungs and the digestive system. • To understand the value of MRI when compared to US in assessing fetal anomalies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus