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High 10-year survival rate with an anatomic cementless stem (SPS).

Sariali E, Mouttet A, Mordasini P, Catonné Y - Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: All stems appeared radiographically stable and one stem was graded nonintegrated but stable.Five patients had revision surgery: one on the femoral side (for posttraumatic fracture) and four on the acetabular side.Considering stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survivorship was 100% (range, 95.4%-99.9%) at 10 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hôpital Pitié Salpétrière, 47-83 Bd de l'Hôpital, 75013, Paris, France. hedisari@yahoo.fr

ABSTRACT

Background: Proximal cementless fixation using anatomic stems reportedly increases femoral fit and avoids stress-shielding. However, thigh pain was reported with the early stem designs. Therefore, a new anatomic cementless stem design was based on an average three-dimensional metaphyseal femoral shape. However, it is unclear whether this stem reduces the incidence of thigh pain.

Questions/purposes: We asked whether this stem design was associated with a low incidence of thigh pain and provided durable fixation and high function.

Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients (176 THAs) who had the anatomic proximal hydroxyapatite-coated stem implanted were reviewed. Eleven (6%) patients were lost to followup and 34 (20%) died without revision surgery. We used the Harris hip score (HHS) to assess pain and function. We evaluated femoral stem fixation and stability with the score of Engh et al. and also calculated a 10-year survival analysis. We assessed 126 patients (131 hips) at a mean followup of 10 years (range, 8-11 years)

Results: At last followup, two patients described slight thigh pain that did not limit their physical activities. All stems appeared radiographically stable and one stem was graded nonintegrated but stable. Five patients had revision surgery: one on the femoral side (for posttraumatic fracture) and four on the acetabular side. Considering stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survivorship was 100% (range, 95.4%-99.9%) at 10 years.

Conclusion: This anatomic cementless design using only metaphyseal fixation with a wide mediolateral flare, a sagittal curvature, and torsion, allowed durable proximal stem stability and fixation.

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The graph shows the survival rate was 100% (95% CI) when taking revision for aseptic loosening of the stem as an end point.
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Fig5: The graph shows the survival rate was 100% (95% CI) when taking revision for aseptic loosening of the stem as an end point.

Mentions: Considering revision for any reason as the end point, mean survivorship was 97% (range, 95%–99.9%) at 10 years (Fig. 4). For stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, the survivorship was 100% (range, 95%–99.9%) at 10 years (Fig. 5), and for cup revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, the survivorship was 99.3% (range, 95%–99.9%) at 10 years. At last followup, five patients had undergone revision surgery: four patients on the acetabular side and one on the femoral side. We performed revisions for cup aseptic loosening in one patient (at 8 years), late instability related to severe wear in three patients (at 2, 8, and 8 years), and a posttraumatic femur fracture in one patient (at 2 years) (Table 1). No patient underwent revision surgery for femoral stem loosening.Fig. 4


High 10-year survival rate with an anatomic cementless stem (SPS).

Sariali E, Mouttet A, Mordasini P, Catonné Y - Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. (2012)

The graph shows the survival rate was 100% (95% CI) when taking revision for aseptic loosening of the stem as an end point.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369068&req=5

Fig5: The graph shows the survival rate was 100% (95% CI) when taking revision for aseptic loosening of the stem as an end point.
Mentions: Considering revision for any reason as the end point, mean survivorship was 97% (range, 95%–99.9%) at 10 years (Fig. 4). For stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, the survivorship was 100% (range, 95%–99.9%) at 10 years (Fig. 5), and for cup revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, the survivorship was 99.3% (range, 95%–99.9%) at 10 years. At last followup, five patients had undergone revision surgery: four patients on the acetabular side and one on the femoral side. We performed revisions for cup aseptic loosening in one patient (at 8 years), late instability related to severe wear in three patients (at 2, 8, and 8 years), and a posttraumatic femur fracture in one patient (at 2 years) (Table 1). No patient underwent revision surgery for femoral stem loosening.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: All stems appeared radiographically stable and one stem was graded nonintegrated but stable.Five patients had revision surgery: one on the femoral side (for posttraumatic fracture) and four on the acetabular side.Considering stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survivorship was 100% (range, 95.4%-99.9%) at 10 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hôpital Pitié Salpétrière, 47-83 Bd de l'Hôpital, 75013, Paris, France. hedisari@yahoo.fr

ABSTRACT

Background: Proximal cementless fixation using anatomic stems reportedly increases femoral fit and avoids stress-shielding. However, thigh pain was reported with the early stem designs. Therefore, a new anatomic cementless stem design was based on an average three-dimensional metaphyseal femoral shape. However, it is unclear whether this stem reduces the incidence of thigh pain.

Questions/purposes: We asked whether this stem design was associated with a low incidence of thigh pain and provided durable fixation and high function.

Methods: One hundred seventy-one patients (176 THAs) who had the anatomic proximal hydroxyapatite-coated stem implanted were reviewed. Eleven (6%) patients were lost to followup and 34 (20%) died without revision surgery. We used the Harris hip score (HHS) to assess pain and function. We evaluated femoral stem fixation and stability with the score of Engh et al. and also calculated a 10-year survival analysis. We assessed 126 patients (131 hips) at a mean followup of 10 years (range, 8-11 years)

Results: At last followup, two patients described slight thigh pain that did not limit their physical activities. All stems appeared radiographically stable and one stem was graded nonintegrated but stable. Five patients had revision surgery: one on the femoral side (for posttraumatic fracture) and four on the acetabular side. Considering stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survivorship was 100% (range, 95.4%-99.9%) at 10 years.

Conclusion: This anatomic cementless design using only metaphyseal fixation with a wide mediolateral flare, a sagittal curvature, and torsion, allowed durable proximal stem stability and fixation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus