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Thoracolumbar scoliosis posterior approach.

Obeid I, Bourghli A, Vital JM - Eur Spine J (2012)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bordeaux University Hospital, 33076, Bordeaux, France. Ibrahim.obeid@chu-bordeaux.fr

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report on a female patient diagnosed with Currarino’s triad in adulthood.

Case report: This case presents an adult patient with a medical history of a congenital anal atresia, a partial sacral agenesis, and a surgically treated ectopic anus. After a coincidentally observed presacral mass by MRI, due to unexplained constipation later in adulthood, Currarino’s triad was suspected in this patient. This triad consists of anorectal malformation(s), sacrococcygeal defects and a presacral mass of various origin. Further investigation confirmed the mass to be a meningocele, and showed a tethered cord and a syrinx.

Conclusions: In (young) patients with anorectal malformations, although having no other symptoms, further examination might be required to exclude Currarino’s triad. Importance of early diagnosis and multidisciplinary assessment is recommended to establish adequate treatment if needed.

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Pelvic X-ray Arrow A: the partial sacral agenesis
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Fig1: Pelvic X-ray Arrow A: the partial sacral agenesis

Mentions: A 22-year-old Caucasian female was seen in the neurosurgical outpatient clinic. The family history was irrelevant. Her medical history revealed a congenital anal atresia and an ectopic anus. At the age of 3 years, the latter was corrected with an anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP) procedure. Furthermore, she had suffered from grade III vesico-ureteral reflux. X-ray imaging of the lumbar spine confirmed a partial sacral agenesis, sickle-shaped sacrum (Fig. 1). After surgery, constipation resolved without fecal incontinence. She was followed-up by the pediatric surgeon. Otherwise, she was in healthy condition and is currently employed as a registered nurse.Fig. 1


Thoracolumbar scoliosis posterior approach.

Obeid I, Bourghli A, Vital JM - Eur Spine J (2012)

Pelvic X-ray Arrow A: the partial sacral agenesis
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3369045&req=5

Fig1: Pelvic X-ray Arrow A: the partial sacral agenesis
Mentions: A 22-year-old Caucasian female was seen in the neurosurgical outpatient clinic. The family history was irrelevant. Her medical history revealed a congenital anal atresia and an ectopic anus. At the age of 3 years, the latter was corrected with an anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP) procedure. Furthermore, she had suffered from grade III vesico-ureteral reflux. X-ray imaging of the lumbar spine confirmed a partial sacral agenesis, sickle-shaped sacrum (Fig. 1). After surgery, constipation resolved without fecal incontinence. She was followed-up by the pediatric surgeon. Otherwise, she was in healthy condition and is currently employed as a registered nurse.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bordeaux University Hospital, 33076, Bordeaux, France. Ibrahim.obeid@chu-bordeaux.fr

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report on a female patient diagnosed with Currarino’s triad in adulthood.

Case report: This case presents an adult patient with a medical history of a congenital anal atresia, a partial sacral agenesis, and a surgically treated ectopic anus. After a coincidentally observed presacral mass by MRI, due to unexplained constipation later in adulthood, Currarino’s triad was suspected in this patient. This triad consists of anorectal malformation(s), sacrococcygeal defects and a presacral mass of various origin. Further investigation confirmed the mass to be a meningocele, and showed a tethered cord and a syrinx.

Conclusions: In (young) patients with anorectal malformations, although having no other symptoms, further examination might be required to exclude Currarino’s triad. Importance of early diagnosis and multidisciplinary assessment is recommended to establish adequate treatment if needed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus