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A preliminary analysis of sleep-like states in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

Frank MG, Waldrop RH, Dumoulin M, Aton S, Boal JG - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep has only been observed in vertebrates.We find that cuttlefish exhibit frequent quiescent periods that are homeostatically regulated, satisfying two criteria for sleep.Our findings thus suggest that at least two different sleep-like states may exist in Sepia officinalis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. mgf@mail.med.upenn.edu

ABSTRACT
Sleep has been observed in several invertebrate species, but its presence in marine invertebrates is relatively unexplored. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep has only been observed in vertebrates. We investigated whether the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis displays sleep-like states. We find that cuttlefish exhibit frequent quiescent periods that are homeostatically regulated, satisfying two criteria for sleep. In addition, cuttlefish transiently display a quiescent state with rapid eye movements, changes in body coloration and twitching of the arms, that is possibly analogous to REM sleep. Our findings thus suggest that at least two different sleep-like states may exist in Sepia officinalis.

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Quiescence (sleep) deprivation in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.Five juvenile cuttlefish were sleep deprived for 48 hours by continuous visual stimulation via a computer monitor positioned beneath their aquarium. During the following 24 hour recovery period, there was an overall compensatory increase in quiescence as revealed by a main effect of condition (baseline rest vs. after rest deprivation) in a 2 way ANOVA (Time and Condition as main factors): Condition: F = 6.3, p<0.013, Time: F = 9.6 p<0.001, interaction: F = 1.3, p = 0.18). Data are hourly mean (± std. deviation) behavioral scores.
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pone-0038125-g004: Quiescence (sleep) deprivation in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.Five juvenile cuttlefish were sleep deprived for 48 hours by continuous visual stimulation via a computer monitor positioned beneath their aquarium. During the following 24 hour recovery period, there was an overall compensatory increase in quiescence as revealed by a main effect of condition (baseline rest vs. after rest deprivation) in a 2 way ANOVA (Time and Condition as main factors): Condition: F = 6.3, p<0.013, Time: F = 9.6 p<0.001, interaction: F = 1.3, p = 0.18). Data are hourly mean (± std. deviation) behavioral scores.

Mentions: In contrast to the senescent adults (Experiment 1), all juvenile cuttlefish showed clear diurnal organization in rest and activity (Table 1). Activity was highest at night, consistent with nocturnal activity patterns of wild-caught cuttlefish [22]. In addition, juvenile cuttlefish showed significantly more rest during the day than senescent cuttlefish. 48 hours of rest deprivation resulted in compensatory increases in rest time during the first 24 hours of recovery, indicative of homeostatic regulation. (ANOVA F = 6.3, p<0.013, Figure 4). None of the juvenile cuttlefish displayed a sleep-like state+CA (see Experiment 1) either before or after the 48 hours of rest deprivation.


A preliminary analysis of sleep-like states in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

Frank MG, Waldrop RH, Dumoulin M, Aton S, Boal JG - PLoS ONE (2012)

Quiescence (sleep) deprivation in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.Five juvenile cuttlefish were sleep deprived for 48 hours by continuous visual stimulation via a computer monitor positioned beneath their aquarium. During the following 24 hour recovery period, there was an overall compensatory increase in quiescence as revealed by a main effect of condition (baseline rest vs. after rest deprivation) in a 2 way ANOVA (Time and Condition as main factors): Condition: F = 6.3, p<0.013, Time: F = 9.6 p<0.001, interaction: F = 1.3, p = 0.18). Data are hourly mean (± std. deviation) behavioral scores.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368927&req=5

pone-0038125-g004: Quiescence (sleep) deprivation in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.Five juvenile cuttlefish were sleep deprived for 48 hours by continuous visual stimulation via a computer monitor positioned beneath their aquarium. During the following 24 hour recovery period, there was an overall compensatory increase in quiescence as revealed by a main effect of condition (baseline rest vs. after rest deprivation) in a 2 way ANOVA (Time and Condition as main factors): Condition: F = 6.3, p<0.013, Time: F = 9.6 p<0.001, interaction: F = 1.3, p = 0.18). Data are hourly mean (± std. deviation) behavioral scores.
Mentions: In contrast to the senescent adults (Experiment 1), all juvenile cuttlefish showed clear diurnal organization in rest and activity (Table 1). Activity was highest at night, consistent with nocturnal activity patterns of wild-caught cuttlefish [22]. In addition, juvenile cuttlefish showed significantly more rest during the day than senescent cuttlefish. 48 hours of rest deprivation resulted in compensatory increases in rest time during the first 24 hours of recovery, indicative of homeostatic regulation. (ANOVA F = 6.3, p<0.013, Figure 4). None of the juvenile cuttlefish displayed a sleep-like state+CA (see Experiment 1) either before or after the 48 hours of rest deprivation.

Bottom Line: Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep has only been observed in vertebrates.We find that cuttlefish exhibit frequent quiescent periods that are homeostatically regulated, satisfying two criteria for sleep.Our findings thus suggest that at least two different sleep-like states may exist in Sepia officinalis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. mgf@mail.med.upenn.edu

ABSTRACT
Sleep has been observed in several invertebrate species, but its presence in marine invertebrates is relatively unexplored. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep has only been observed in vertebrates. We investigated whether the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis displays sleep-like states. We find that cuttlefish exhibit frequent quiescent periods that are homeostatically regulated, satisfying two criteria for sleep. In addition, cuttlefish transiently display a quiescent state with rapid eye movements, changes in body coloration and twitching of the arms, that is possibly analogous to REM sleep. Our findings thus suggest that at least two different sleep-like states may exist in Sepia officinalis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus