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Biomarkers of disease differentiation: HCV recurrence versus acute cellular rejection.

Gehrau R, Mas V, Archer K, Maluf D - Fibrogenesis Tissue Repair (2012)

Bottom Line: Liver Transplantation (LT) is the optimal surgical treatment for HCV-cirrhotic patients at end-stage liver disease.The accurate differential diagnosis between both conditions is critical for treatment choice, and similar histological features represent a challenge for pathologists.Whole-genome gene expression (WGE) analyses through well-defined oligonucleotide microarray platforms represent a powerful tool for the molecular characterization of biological process.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Virginia, Department of Surgery, Transplant Division, P.O. Box 800625, 904 Lane Rd, Charlottesville, VA, 22908-0625, USA.

ABSTRACT
The wound-healing process induced by chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection triggers liver damage characterized by fibrosis development and finally cirrhosis. Liver Transplantation (LT) is the optimal surgical treatment for HCV-cirrhotic patients at end-stage liver disease. However, acute cellular rejection (ACR) and HCV recurrence disease represent two devastating complications post-LT. The accurate differential diagnosis between both conditions is critical for treatment choice, and similar histological features represent a challenge for pathologists. Moreover, the HCV recurrence disease severity is highly variable post-LT. HCV recurrence disease progression is characterized by an accelerated fibrogenesis process, and almost 30% of those patients develop cirrhosis at 5-years of follow-up. Whole-genome gene expression (WGE) analyses through well-defined oligonucleotide microarray platforms represent a powerful tool for the molecular characterization of biological process. In the present manuscript, the utility of microarray technology is applied for the ACR and HCV-recurrence biological characterization in post-LT liver biopsy samples. Moreover, WGE analysis was performed to identify predictive biomarkers of HCV recurrence severity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded liver biopsies prospectively collected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the liver wound-healing process in HCV infected patients. An arrowhead indicates a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesion. MELD: Model of End Stage Liver Disease. LT: Liver Transplantation.
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Figure 1: Schematic representation of the liver wound-healing process in HCV infected patients. An arrowhead indicates a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesion. MELD: Model of End Stage Liver Disease. LT: Liver Transplantation.

Mentions: Hepatotropic viruses, especially hepatitis C (HCV) virus, constitute the principal chronic liver injury etiology [6]. After 15-20 years, most of HCV-chronic infected patients will develop liver cirrhosis characterized by a distortion of the hepatic architecture and vascular structure, and a nodular transformation of the liver surface [1,2,7]. Clinical characteristics of liver fibrosis are associated with hepatocellular dysfunction and increased intrahepatic resistance to blood flow leading to hepatic insufficiency and portal hypertension, and associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 5% of cases [8-11]. Despite available therapeutic protocols aimed to treat the etiological agent (virus), stellate cells (involved in liver fibrogenesis), or specific signaling pathways, there is no effective pharmaceutical intervention for liver fibrosis associated with viral injury [5]. In this regard, HCV-cirrhotic patients at end stage liver disease have been prominently beneficiated with liver transplant (LT). Indeed, HCV induced cirrhosis with or without HCC is the leading indication for liver transplantation (LT) in USA, Europe and Japan [12,13] (Figure 1).


Biomarkers of disease differentiation: HCV recurrence versus acute cellular rejection.

Gehrau R, Mas V, Archer K, Maluf D - Fibrogenesis Tissue Repair (2012)

Schematic representation of the liver wound-healing process in HCV infected patients. An arrowhead indicates a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesion. MELD: Model of End Stage Liver Disease. LT: Liver Transplantation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368799&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic representation of the liver wound-healing process in HCV infected patients. An arrowhead indicates a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesion. MELD: Model of End Stage Liver Disease. LT: Liver Transplantation.
Mentions: Hepatotropic viruses, especially hepatitis C (HCV) virus, constitute the principal chronic liver injury etiology [6]. After 15-20 years, most of HCV-chronic infected patients will develop liver cirrhosis characterized by a distortion of the hepatic architecture and vascular structure, and a nodular transformation of the liver surface [1,2,7]. Clinical characteristics of liver fibrosis are associated with hepatocellular dysfunction and increased intrahepatic resistance to blood flow leading to hepatic insufficiency and portal hypertension, and associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 5% of cases [8-11]. Despite available therapeutic protocols aimed to treat the etiological agent (virus), stellate cells (involved in liver fibrogenesis), or specific signaling pathways, there is no effective pharmaceutical intervention for liver fibrosis associated with viral injury [5]. In this regard, HCV-cirrhotic patients at end stage liver disease have been prominently beneficiated with liver transplant (LT). Indeed, HCV induced cirrhosis with or without HCC is the leading indication for liver transplantation (LT) in USA, Europe and Japan [12,13] (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Liver Transplantation (LT) is the optimal surgical treatment for HCV-cirrhotic patients at end-stage liver disease.The accurate differential diagnosis between both conditions is critical for treatment choice, and similar histological features represent a challenge for pathologists.Whole-genome gene expression (WGE) analyses through well-defined oligonucleotide microarray platforms represent a powerful tool for the molecular characterization of biological process.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Virginia, Department of Surgery, Transplant Division, P.O. Box 800625, 904 Lane Rd, Charlottesville, VA, 22908-0625, USA.

ABSTRACT
The wound-healing process induced by chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection triggers liver damage characterized by fibrosis development and finally cirrhosis. Liver Transplantation (LT) is the optimal surgical treatment for HCV-cirrhotic patients at end-stage liver disease. However, acute cellular rejection (ACR) and HCV recurrence disease represent two devastating complications post-LT. The accurate differential diagnosis between both conditions is critical for treatment choice, and similar histological features represent a challenge for pathologists. Moreover, the HCV recurrence disease severity is highly variable post-LT. HCV recurrence disease progression is characterized by an accelerated fibrogenesis process, and almost 30% of those patients develop cirrhosis at 5-years of follow-up. Whole-genome gene expression (WGE) analyses through well-defined oligonucleotide microarray platforms represent a powerful tool for the molecular characterization of biological process. In the present manuscript, the utility of microarray technology is applied for the ACR and HCV-recurrence biological characterization in post-LT liver biopsy samples. Moreover, WGE analysis was performed to identify predictive biomarkers of HCV recurrence severity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded liver biopsies prospectively collected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus