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Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia.

Oleszczyk M, Svab I, Seifert B, Krztoń-Królewiecka A, Windak A - BMC Fam Pract (2012)

Bottom Line: Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia.Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine.The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Chair of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow, Krakow, Poland. marek.oleszczyk@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries.

Methods: A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review.

Results: Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia.

Conclusions: Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process.

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Minimal and/or maximal patients' list size.
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Figure 3: Minimal and/or maximal patients' list size.

Mentions: In all study countries family physicians/general practitioners have their personal list of patients. In seven countries (see Figure 3) the list size is regulated but those regulations might be just formal (e.g. most of the Hungarian doctors--contractors of municipal authorities--are obliged to have larger than formal minimal list of 200 patients). There was no agreement on this matter in Croatia.


Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia.

Oleszczyk M, Svab I, Seifert B, Krztoń-Królewiecka A, Windak A - BMC Fam Pract (2012)

Minimal and/or maximal patients' list size.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368769&req=5

Figure 3: Minimal and/or maximal patients' list size.
Mentions: In all study countries family physicians/general practitioners have their personal list of patients. In seven countries (see Figure 3) the list size is regulated but those regulations might be just formal (e.g. most of the Hungarian doctors--contractors of municipal authorities--are obliged to have larger than formal minimal list of 200 patients). There was no agreement on this matter in Croatia.

Bottom Line: Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia.Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine.The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Chair of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow, Krakow, Poland. marek.oleszczyk@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries.

Methods: A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review.

Results: Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia.

Conclusions: Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process.

Show MeSH