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Vapor phase mediated cellular uptake of sub 5 nm nanoparticles.

Serdiuk T, Lysenko V, Skryshevsky VA, Géloën A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2012)

Bottom Line: Although the potential of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology is promising, a number of questions concerning the safety of nanomaterials and the risk/benefit ratio of their usage are open.Here, we have shown that nanoparticles produced from silicon carbide (NPs) dispersed in colloidal suspensions are able to penetrate into surrounding air environment during the natural evaporation of the colloids and label biological cells via vapor phase.However, scientists dealing with the colloidal NPs have to seriously consider such a NP's natural transfer in order to protect their own health as well as to avoid any contamination of the control samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Lyon, Nanotechnology Institute of Lyon (INL), UMR-5270, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621, France. tetiana.serdiuk@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Nanoparticles became an important and wide-used tool for cell imaging because of their unique optical properties. Although the potential of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology is promising, a number of questions concerning the safety of nanomaterials and the risk/benefit ratio of their usage are open. Here, we have shown that nanoparticles produced from silicon carbide (NPs) dispersed in colloidal suspensions are able to penetrate into surrounding air environment during the natural evaporation of the colloids and label biological cells via vapor phase. Natural gradual size-tuning of NPs in dependence to the distance from the NP liquid source allows progressive shift of the fluorescence color of labeled cells in the blue region according to the increase of the distance from the NP suspension. This effect may be used for the soft vapor labeling of biological cells with the possibility of controlling the color of fluorescence. However, scientists dealing with the colloidal NPs have to seriously consider such a NP's natural transfer in order to protect their own health as well as to avoid any contamination of the control samples.

No MeSH data available.


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Size distribution of the NPs (a). Inset shows a typical photoluminescence spectrum of NPs obtained from 3 C-SiC. (b) Schematic view of the experimental set-up. Onion cells are mounted on a mobile holder situated above a colloidal suspension containing the fluorescent NPs. Fluorescence images of the onion epidermal cells exposed to the suspensions without (c) and with (d) NPs.
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Figure 1: Size distribution of the NPs (a). Inset shows a typical photoluminescence spectrum of NPs obtained from 3 C-SiC. (b) Schematic view of the experimental set-up. Onion cells are mounted on a mobile holder situated above a colloidal suspension containing the fluorescent NPs. Fluorescence images of the onion epidermal cells exposed to the suspensions without (c) and with (d) NPs.

Mentions: Typical size distribution of NPs obtained from the 3 C-SiC is presented in Figure 1a. As one can see, the majority of the NP dimensions are below 5 nm, with the most probable size value being around 2.5 nm. The inset in Figure 1a shows a typical photoluminescence spectrum of the NPs dispersed in aqueous suspensions under ultraviolet excitation. Since the mean size value of the NPs shown in Figure 1a is smaller than the Bohr's diameter of the exciton in bulk SiC substrate (approximately 5.4 nm), they exhibit highly efficient luminescence with energies higher than the bandgap energy of the bulk SiC substrate due to spatial and quantum confinement effects [13,14]. An example of a daylight photo of the centrifuged optically homogeneous colloidal suspension of the NPs used in our work is also shown in Figure 1a. Experimental samples were fixed above the NP suspension, as it is schematically shown in Figure 1b at different height.


Vapor phase mediated cellular uptake of sub 5 nm nanoparticles.

Serdiuk T, Lysenko V, Skryshevsky VA, Géloën A - Nanoscale Res Lett (2012)

Size distribution of the NPs (a). Inset shows a typical photoluminescence spectrum of NPs obtained from 3 C-SiC. (b) Schematic view of the experimental set-up. Onion cells are mounted on a mobile holder situated above a colloidal suspension containing the fluorescent NPs. Fluorescence images of the onion epidermal cells exposed to the suspensions without (c) and with (d) NPs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368743&req=5

Figure 1: Size distribution of the NPs (a). Inset shows a typical photoluminescence spectrum of NPs obtained from 3 C-SiC. (b) Schematic view of the experimental set-up. Onion cells are mounted on a mobile holder situated above a colloidal suspension containing the fluorescent NPs. Fluorescence images of the onion epidermal cells exposed to the suspensions without (c) and with (d) NPs.
Mentions: Typical size distribution of NPs obtained from the 3 C-SiC is presented in Figure 1a. As one can see, the majority of the NP dimensions are below 5 nm, with the most probable size value being around 2.5 nm. The inset in Figure 1a shows a typical photoluminescence spectrum of the NPs dispersed in aqueous suspensions under ultraviolet excitation. Since the mean size value of the NPs shown in Figure 1a is smaller than the Bohr's diameter of the exciton in bulk SiC substrate (approximately 5.4 nm), they exhibit highly efficient luminescence with energies higher than the bandgap energy of the bulk SiC substrate due to spatial and quantum confinement effects [13,14]. An example of a daylight photo of the centrifuged optically homogeneous colloidal suspension of the NPs used in our work is also shown in Figure 1a. Experimental samples were fixed above the NP suspension, as it is schematically shown in Figure 1b at different height.

Bottom Line: Although the potential of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology is promising, a number of questions concerning the safety of nanomaterials and the risk/benefit ratio of their usage are open.Here, we have shown that nanoparticles produced from silicon carbide (NPs) dispersed in colloidal suspensions are able to penetrate into surrounding air environment during the natural evaporation of the colloids and label biological cells via vapor phase.However, scientists dealing with the colloidal NPs have to seriously consider such a NP's natural transfer in order to protect their own health as well as to avoid any contamination of the control samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Lyon, Nanotechnology Institute of Lyon (INL), UMR-5270, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621, France. tetiana.serdiuk@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Nanoparticles became an important and wide-used tool for cell imaging because of their unique optical properties. Although the potential of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology is promising, a number of questions concerning the safety of nanomaterials and the risk/benefit ratio of their usage are open. Here, we have shown that nanoparticles produced from silicon carbide (NPs) dispersed in colloidal suspensions are able to penetrate into surrounding air environment during the natural evaporation of the colloids and label biological cells via vapor phase. Natural gradual size-tuning of NPs in dependence to the distance from the NP liquid source allows progressive shift of the fluorescence color of labeled cells in the blue region according to the increase of the distance from the NP suspension. This effect may be used for the soft vapor labeling of biological cells with the possibility of controlling the color of fluorescence. However, scientists dealing with the colloidal NPs have to seriously consider such a NP's natural transfer in order to protect their own health as well as to avoid any contamination of the control samples.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus