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A review of psoriasis, a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease and its impact on folate and homocysteine metabolism.

McDonald I, Connolly M, Tobin AM - J Nutr Metab (2012)

Bottom Line: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.This risk has been attributed to an association with many independent risk factors including obesity, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia.It has been postulated that low folate levels in this group may be a direct cause of hyperhomocysteinemia and therefore a treatable risk factor by folate supplementation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This risk has been attributed to an association with many independent risk factors including obesity, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia. Psoriasis patients also have lower levels of folate and conversely higher levels of homocysteine, which in itself is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It has been postulated that low folate levels in this group may be a direct cause of hyperhomocysteinemia and therefore a treatable risk factor by folate supplementation. This paper looks at the literature published to date on the relationship between psoriasis, homocysteine, and folate levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed mechanism of homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis [21].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368579&req=5

fig1: Proposed mechanism of homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis [21].

Mentions: Hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 umol/L) is thought to favour atherosclerosis and vascular thrombosis by a number of mechanisms. These include damaging endothelial cells, promoting clot formation, decreasing flexibility of blood vessels leading to aortic stiffness, and reducing blood flow velocity [20]. The endothelial dysfunction is thought to result from the accumulation of asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) which is a natural inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. As a result there is a reduction in the production of the vasodilator nitric oxide which protects the vessel wall against the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and thrombosis (Figure 1).


A review of psoriasis, a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease and its impact on folate and homocysteine metabolism.

McDonald I, Connolly M, Tobin AM - J Nutr Metab (2012)

Proposed mechanism of homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis [21].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368579&req=5

fig1: Proposed mechanism of homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis [21].
Mentions: Hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 umol/L) is thought to favour atherosclerosis and vascular thrombosis by a number of mechanisms. These include damaging endothelial cells, promoting clot formation, decreasing flexibility of blood vessels leading to aortic stiffness, and reducing blood flow velocity [20]. The endothelial dysfunction is thought to result from the accumulation of asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) which is a natural inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. As a result there is a reduction in the production of the vasodilator nitric oxide which protects the vessel wall against the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and thrombosis (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.This risk has been attributed to an association with many independent risk factors including obesity, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia.It has been postulated that low folate levels in this group may be a direct cause of hyperhomocysteinemia and therefore a treatable risk factor by folate supplementation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This risk has been attributed to an association with many independent risk factors including obesity, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia. Psoriasis patients also have lower levels of folate and conversely higher levels of homocysteine, which in itself is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It has been postulated that low folate levels in this group may be a direct cause of hyperhomocysteinemia and therefore a treatable risk factor by folate supplementation. This paper looks at the literature published to date on the relationship between psoriasis, homocysteine, and folate levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus