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Studies of olfactory system neural plasticity: the contribution of the unilateral naris occlusion technique.

Coppola DM - Neural Plast. (2012)

Bottom Line: Early experiments emphasized naris occlusion's deleterious and age-critical effects.More recent studies have focused on life-long vulnerability, particularly on neurogenesis, and compensatory responses to deprivation.This paper focuses on recent data, new theories, and underappreciated caveats related to the use of this technique in studies of olfactory plasticity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Randolph Macon College, Ashland, VA 23005, USA. dcoppola@rmc.edu

ABSTRACT
Unilateral naris occlusion has long been the method of choice for effecting stimulus deprivation in studies of olfactory plasticity. A significant body of literature speaks to the myriad consequences of this manipulation on the ipsilateral olfactory pathway. Early experiments emphasized naris occlusion's deleterious and age-critical effects. More recent studies have focused on life-long vulnerability, particularly on neurogenesis, and compensatory responses to deprivation. Despite the abundance of empirical data, a theoretical framework in which to understand the many sequelae of naris occlusion on olfaction has been elusive. This paper focuses on recent data, new theories, and underappreciated caveats related to the use of this technique in studies of olfactory plasticity.

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Diagram of the predicted effects of odor deprivation (left) and enrichment (right) according to the compensation/homeostasis hypothesis and induction/perceptual learning hypothesis on the olfactory mucosa, bulb, and behavior. Compensation makes no specific prediction about odor discrimination but this may necessarily be opposite to the predicted effects on detection based on bulbar neural circuits. Induction predicts greater detection under enrichment. Perceptual learning predicts greater discrimination under enrichment (see text for further explanation).
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fig4: Diagram of the predicted effects of odor deprivation (left) and enrichment (right) according to the compensation/homeostasis hypothesis and induction/perceptual learning hypothesis on the olfactory mucosa, bulb, and behavior. Compensation makes no specific prediction about odor discrimination but this may necessarily be opposite to the predicted effects on detection based on bulbar neural circuits. Induction predicts greater detection under enrichment. Perceptual learning predicts greater discrimination under enrichment (see text for further explanation).

Mentions: As a heuristic exercise, the predicted effects of deprivation or enrichment on the olfactory system at the levels of the mucosa, bulb, and behavior can be contrasted for the induction, perceptual learning, and compensation paradigms (Figure 4). Notably, in some circumstances the predicted effects of these processes are congruent and in others they are in conflict.


Studies of olfactory system neural plasticity: the contribution of the unilateral naris occlusion technique.

Coppola DM - Neural Plast. (2012)

Diagram of the predicted effects of odor deprivation (left) and enrichment (right) according to the compensation/homeostasis hypothesis and induction/perceptual learning hypothesis on the olfactory mucosa, bulb, and behavior. Compensation makes no specific prediction about odor discrimination but this may necessarily be opposite to the predicted effects on detection based on bulbar neural circuits. Induction predicts greater detection under enrichment. Perceptual learning predicts greater discrimination under enrichment (see text for further explanation).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368527&req=5

fig4: Diagram of the predicted effects of odor deprivation (left) and enrichment (right) according to the compensation/homeostasis hypothesis and induction/perceptual learning hypothesis on the olfactory mucosa, bulb, and behavior. Compensation makes no specific prediction about odor discrimination but this may necessarily be opposite to the predicted effects on detection based on bulbar neural circuits. Induction predicts greater detection under enrichment. Perceptual learning predicts greater discrimination under enrichment (see text for further explanation).
Mentions: As a heuristic exercise, the predicted effects of deprivation or enrichment on the olfactory system at the levels of the mucosa, bulb, and behavior can be contrasted for the induction, perceptual learning, and compensation paradigms (Figure 4). Notably, in some circumstances the predicted effects of these processes are congruent and in others they are in conflict.

Bottom Line: Early experiments emphasized naris occlusion's deleterious and age-critical effects.More recent studies have focused on life-long vulnerability, particularly on neurogenesis, and compensatory responses to deprivation.This paper focuses on recent data, new theories, and underappreciated caveats related to the use of this technique in studies of olfactory plasticity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Randolph Macon College, Ashland, VA 23005, USA. dcoppola@rmc.edu

ABSTRACT
Unilateral naris occlusion has long been the method of choice for effecting stimulus deprivation in studies of olfactory plasticity. A significant body of literature speaks to the myriad consequences of this manipulation on the ipsilateral olfactory pathway. Early experiments emphasized naris occlusion's deleterious and age-critical effects. More recent studies have focused on life-long vulnerability, particularly on neurogenesis, and compensatory responses to deprivation. Despite the abundance of empirical data, a theoretical framework in which to understand the many sequelae of naris occlusion on olfaction has been elusive. This paper focuses on recent data, new theories, and underappreciated caveats related to the use of this technique in studies of olfactory plasticity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus