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Cryptosporidiosis-an overview.

Leitch GJ, He Q - J Biomed Res (2012)

Bottom Line: While there are invasive free living stages, proliferation and differentiation take place within a unique parasitrophorous vacuole under the host cell brush border but outside the host cell cytoplasm.In immunodeficient or immunosuppressed individuals, diarrhea may be copious and can result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in AIDS patients.Although diagnosis is relatively simple, effective drug treatment, particulary for infections in immunodeficient patients, has not been uniformly successful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30310-1495, USA.

ABSTRACT
Apicomplexan protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium infect the gastrointestinal tract and lungs of a wide variety of animals, including humans. The majority of human infections are due to either Cryptosporidium hominis (C. hominis) and/or Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum). The parasite has a complex life cycle that includes both asexual and sexual stages. While there are invasive free living stages, proliferation and differentiation take place within a unique parasitrophorous vacuole under the host cell brush border but outside the host cell cytoplasm. Infection is spread by environmentally resistant spores that primarily contaminate drinking water and occasionally food sources, which may cause significant outbreaks of diarrhea that generally lasts less than 2 w in immunocompetent individuals. In immunodeficient or immunosuppressed individuals, diarrhea may be copious and can result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in AIDS patients. Although diagnosis is relatively simple, effective drug treatment, particulary for infections in immunodeficient patients, has not been uniformly successful. This overview summarizes the species known to infect humans, aspects of the parasite life cycle, sources of infection, the pathophysiology of cryptosporidiosis, the immune response to infection, diagnosis, treatment and some aspects of cryptosporidiosis in China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cryptosporidium pervum type I meront in the jejunal epithelium of a nude mouse showing such characteristic features as an electron-dense desmosome-like boundary between host cell and parasitophorous vacuole, a pronounced feeder organelle (FO), residual body (RB), and merozoites (Mz). The enterocyte brush border microvilli immediately adjacent to the parasite are typically elongated.
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jbr-25-01-001-g001: Cryptosporidium pervum type I meront in the jejunal epithelium of a nude mouse showing such characteristic features as an electron-dense desmosome-like boundary between host cell and parasitophorous vacuole, a pronounced feeder organelle (FO), residual body (RB), and merozoites (Mz). The enterocyte brush border microvilli immediately adjacent to the parasite are typically elongated.

Mentions: Fig. 1 illustrates many of the features referred to above. A type I meront is seen containing merozoites. The feeder organelle lies above the electron dense boundary between host cell and parasitophorous vacuole, while the microvilli immediately adjacent to the parasite are elongated.


Cryptosporidiosis-an overview.

Leitch GJ, He Q - J Biomed Res (2012)

Cryptosporidium pervum type I meront in the jejunal epithelium of a nude mouse showing such characteristic features as an electron-dense desmosome-like boundary between host cell and parasitophorous vacuole, a pronounced feeder organelle (FO), residual body (RB), and merozoites (Mz). The enterocyte brush border microvilli immediately adjacent to the parasite are typically elongated.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368497&req=5

jbr-25-01-001-g001: Cryptosporidium pervum type I meront in the jejunal epithelium of a nude mouse showing such characteristic features as an electron-dense desmosome-like boundary between host cell and parasitophorous vacuole, a pronounced feeder organelle (FO), residual body (RB), and merozoites (Mz). The enterocyte brush border microvilli immediately adjacent to the parasite are typically elongated.
Mentions: Fig. 1 illustrates many of the features referred to above. A type I meront is seen containing merozoites. The feeder organelle lies above the electron dense boundary between host cell and parasitophorous vacuole, while the microvilli immediately adjacent to the parasite are elongated.

Bottom Line: While there are invasive free living stages, proliferation and differentiation take place within a unique parasitrophorous vacuole under the host cell brush border but outside the host cell cytoplasm.In immunodeficient or immunosuppressed individuals, diarrhea may be copious and can result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in AIDS patients.Although diagnosis is relatively simple, effective drug treatment, particulary for infections in immunodeficient patients, has not been uniformly successful.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30310-1495, USA.

ABSTRACT
Apicomplexan protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium infect the gastrointestinal tract and lungs of a wide variety of animals, including humans. The majority of human infections are due to either Cryptosporidium hominis (C. hominis) and/or Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum). The parasite has a complex life cycle that includes both asexual and sexual stages. While there are invasive free living stages, proliferation and differentiation take place within a unique parasitrophorous vacuole under the host cell brush border but outside the host cell cytoplasm. Infection is spread by environmentally resistant spores that primarily contaminate drinking water and occasionally food sources, which may cause significant outbreaks of diarrhea that generally lasts less than 2 w in immunocompetent individuals. In immunodeficient or immunosuppressed individuals, diarrhea may be copious and can result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in AIDS patients. Although diagnosis is relatively simple, effective drug treatment, particulary for infections in immunodeficient patients, has not been uniformly successful. This overview summarizes the species known to infect humans, aspects of the parasite life cycle, sources of infection, the pathophysiology of cryptosporidiosis, the immune response to infection, diagnosis, treatment and some aspects of cryptosporidiosis in China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus