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The signer and the sign: cortical correlates of person identity and language processing from point-light displays.

Campbell R, Capek CM, Gazarian K, MacSweeney M, Woll B, David AS, McGuire PK, Brammer MJ - Neuropsychologia (2011)

Bottom Line: This activation may reflect the recruitment of information about person identity from the reduced display.Signer identification elicited greater activation than sign identification in (bilateral) inferior temporal gyri (BA 37/19), fusiform gyri (BA 37), middle and posterior portions of the middle temporal gyri (BAs 37 and 19), and superior temporal gyri (BA 22 and 42).Inferior temporal regions associated with the visual recognition of a person appear to be required during SL processing, for both carrier and content information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ESRC Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre (DCAL), Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK. r.campbell@ucl.ac.uk

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Activation for experimental conditions relative to the moving baseline task. (A) Person identification (PI) (top) and (B) sign identification (SI) (bottom); voxel-wise p-value = 0.05, cluster-wise p-value = 0.0025. Six axial sections, showing activation in temporo-occipital and frontal regions are displayed; the left hemisphere is displayed on the left; regions labeled: fusiform gyrus (FG) (Kreifelts, Ethofer, Shiozawa, Grodd, & Wildgruber, 2009), posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS-p), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and precuneus (PCu).
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fig0015: Activation for experimental conditions relative to the moving baseline task. (A) Person identification (PI) (top) and (B) sign identification (SI) (bottom); voxel-wise p-value = 0.05, cluster-wise p-value = 0.0025. Six axial sections, showing activation in temporo-occipital and frontal regions are displayed; the left hemisphere is displayed on the left; regions labeled: fusiform gyrus (FG) (Kreifelts, Ethofer, Shiozawa, Grodd, & Wildgruber, 2009), posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS-p), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and precuneus (PCu).

Mentions: Another novel feature of the present findings compared with previous SL studies was the extent of prefrontal activation in the right, but not left, hemisphere in both PI and SI conditions (Fig. 3). Both Stevens (2004) and Von Kriegstein and Giraud (2004) report extensive right frontal activation when participants identified speaking voices as familiar or unfamiliar (compared with identifying speech content). Activation in right prefrontal regions is associated, more generally, with some aspects of episodic memory retrieval (for review, see Naghavi & Nyberg, 2005), which could be implicated in the present study as respondents try to identify instances of a specific person producing a particular utterance. We cannot rule out the possibility that, at least for respondents who performed the PI task first, there may have been some transfer of experimental ‘set’ to the sign identification task.


The signer and the sign: cortical correlates of person identity and language processing from point-light displays.

Campbell R, Capek CM, Gazarian K, MacSweeney M, Woll B, David AS, McGuire PK, Brammer MJ - Neuropsychologia (2011)

Activation for experimental conditions relative to the moving baseline task. (A) Person identification (PI) (top) and (B) sign identification (SI) (bottom); voxel-wise p-value = 0.05, cluster-wise p-value = 0.0025. Six axial sections, showing activation in temporo-occipital and frontal regions are displayed; the left hemisphere is displayed on the left; regions labeled: fusiform gyrus (FG) (Kreifelts, Ethofer, Shiozawa, Grodd, & Wildgruber, 2009), posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS-p), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and precuneus (PCu).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368430&req=5

fig0015: Activation for experimental conditions relative to the moving baseline task. (A) Person identification (PI) (top) and (B) sign identification (SI) (bottom); voxel-wise p-value = 0.05, cluster-wise p-value = 0.0025. Six axial sections, showing activation in temporo-occipital and frontal regions are displayed; the left hemisphere is displayed on the left; regions labeled: fusiform gyrus (FG) (Kreifelts, Ethofer, Shiozawa, Grodd, & Wildgruber, 2009), posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS-p), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and precuneus (PCu).
Mentions: Another novel feature of the present findings compared with previous SL studies was the extent of prefrontal activation in the right, but not left, hemisphere in both PI and SI conditions (Fig. 3). Both Stevens (2004) and Von Kriegstein and Giraud (2004) report extensive right frontal activation when participants identified speaking voices as familiar or unfamiliar (compared with identifying speech content). Activation in right prefrontal regions is associated, more generally, with some aspects of episodic memory retrieval (for review, see Naghavi & Nyberg, 2005), which could be implicated in the present study as respondents try to identify instances of a specific person producing a particular utterance. We cannot rule out the possibility that, at least for respondents who performed the PI task first, there may have been some transfer of experimental ‘set’ to the sign identification task.

Bottom Line: This activation may reflect the recruitment of information about person identity from the reduced display.Signer identification elicited greater activation than sign identification in (bilateral) inferior temporal gyri (BA 37/19), fusiform gyri (BA 37), middle and posterior portions of the middle temporal gyri (BAs 37 and 19), and superior temporal gyri (BA 22 and 42).Inferior temporal regions associated with the visual recognition of a person appear to be required during SL processing, for both carrier and content information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ESRC Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre (DCAL), Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK. r.campbell@ucl.ac.uk

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus