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Prenatal diagnosis and postnatal findings of cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros: a case report.

Rios LT, Araujo Júnior E, Nardozza LM, Nacaratto DC, Moron AF, Martins Mda G - Case Rep Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Conjoined twins are rare variants of monozygotic twins, which result from an incomplete division of the embryonic disk.In the case of identical and symmetric faces caused by the orientations of the 2 notochordal axes that are perfectly ventroventral, they are called janiceps disymmetros.We present a prenatal diagnosis of a typical case of cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros and the diagnostic confirmation by image and pathology exams.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mother-Child Unit, Universitary Hospital, Federal University of Maranhão (UFMA), 65020-560 São Luiz, MA, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Conjoined twins are rare variants of monozygotic twins, which result from an incomplete division of the embryonic disk. Cephalothoracopagus is a rare twin pregnancy described as imperfect fusion of the head and chest, but separated columns, limbs, and pelvis. They occur with incidence rates that range from 1 per 50,000 to 1 per 100,000 births; however, the incidence of the cephalothoracopagus variety is 1 per 58 conjoined twins. In the case of identical and symmetric faces caused by the orientations of the 2 notochordal axes that are perfectly ventroventral, they are called janiceps disymmetros. We present a prenatal diagnosis of a typical case of cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros and the diagnostic confirmation by image and pathology exams.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros. (a) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing only a skull with two faces and two eyes. (b) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing the brain with the thalamus fusion (blue arrows). (c) Postnatal X-ray showing the fusion of twins from head until upper abdomen. (d) Postnatal postmortem analysis confirming the prenatal diagnosis.
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fig1: Cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros. (a) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing only a skull with two faces and two eyes. (b) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing the brain with the thalamus fusion (blue arrows). (c) Postnatal X-ray showing the fusion of twins from head until upper abdomen. (d) Postnatal postmortem analysis confirming the prenatal diagnosis.

Mentions: A 17-year-old primigravida, 31 weeks of pregnancy, was refereed to our hospital presenting a fetus with a large head circumference, one chest, and two vertebral columns. Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound scan realized with a Voluson 730 Pro machine (General Electric, Medical System, Healthcare, Zipf, Austria) equipped with a volumetric convex probe (RAB 4–8 L) showed a conjoined twin-cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros, one placenta, and polyhydramnios. Twins were fused from head until upper abdomen at the level of the umbilical cord; they had a single chest, a common liver, two vertebral columns, and two hearts. There was one skull with two faces (Figure 1(a)), one of them well-formed with two eyeballs, brain, and duplicates and fused thalamus (Figure 1(b)). After preterm labor at 34 weeks, twins weighed 1, 660 g and were born by Cesarean section, surviving for twenty minutes. The X-ray and postmortem analysis confirmed the prenatal diagnosis (Figures 1(c) and 1(d)).


Prenatal diagnosis and postnatal findings of cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros: a case report.

Rios LT, Araujo Júnior E, Nardozza LM, Nacaratto DC, Moron AF, Martins Mda G - Case Rep Med (2012)

Cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros. (a) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing only a skull with two faces and two eyes. (b) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing the brain with the thalamus fusion (blue arrows). (c) Postnatal X-ray showing the fusion of twins from head until upper abdomen. (d) Postnatal postmortem analysis confirming the prenatal diagnosis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368323&req=5

fig1: Cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros. (a) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing only a skull with two faces and two eyes. (b) Prenatal two-dimensional ultrasound showing the brain with the thalamus fusion (blue arrows). (c) Postnatal X-ray showing the fusion of twins from head until upper abdomen. (d) Postnatal postmortem analysis confirming the prenatal diagnosis.
Mentions: A 17-year-old primigravida, 31 weeks of pregnancy, was refereed to our hospital presenting a fetus with a large head circumference, one chest, and two vertebral columns. Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound scan realized with a Voluson 730 Pro machine (General Electric, Medical System, Healthcare, Zipf, Austria) equipped with a volumetric convex probe (RAB 4–8 L) showed a conjoined twin-cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros, one placenta, and polyhydramnios. Twins were fused from head until upper abdomen at the level of the umbilical cord; they had a single chest, a common liver, two vertebral columns, and two hearts. There was one skull with two faces (Figure 1(a)), one of them well-formed with two eyeballs, brain, and duplicates and fused thalamus (Figure 1(b)). After preterm labor at 34 weeks, twins weighed 1, 660 g and were born by Cesarean section, surviving for twenty minutes. The X-ray and postmortem analysis confirmed the prenatal diagnosis (Figures 1(c) and 1(d)).

Bottom Line: Conjoined twins are rare variants of monozygotic twins, which result from an incomplete division of the embryonic disk.In the case of identical and symmetric faces caused by the orientations of the 2 notochordal axes that are perfectly ventroventral, they are called janiceps disymmetros.We present a prenatal diagnosis of a typical case of cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros and the diagnostic confirmation by image and pathology exams.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mother-Child Unit, Universitary Hospital, Federal University of Maranhão (UFMA), 65020-560 São Luiz, MA, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Conjoined twins are rare variants of monozygotic twins, which result from an incomplete division of the embryonic disk. Cephalothoracopagus is a rare twin pregnancy described as imperfect fusion of the head and chest, but separated columns, limbs, and pelvis. They occur with incidence rates that range from 1 per 50,000 to 1 per 100,000 births; however, the incidence of the cephalothoracopagus variety is 1 per 58 conjoined twins. In the case of identical and symmetric faces caused by the orientations of the 2 notochordal axes that are perfectly ventroventral, they are called janiceps disymmetros. We present a prenatal diagnosis of a typical case of cephalothoracopagus janiceps disymmetros and the diagnostic confirmation by image and pathology exams.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus