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Setting up the speech production network: how oscillations contribute to lateralized information routing.

Gehrig J, Wibral M, Arnold C, Kell CA - Front Psychol (2012)

Bottom Line: This MEG study focuses on the spectro-temporal dynamics that contribute to the setup of this network.While a broadband low frequency effect was found for any task preparation in bilateral prefrontal cortices, preparation for overt speech production was specifically associated with left-lateralized alpha and beta suppression in temporal cortices and beta suppression in motor-related brain regions.Beta phase coupling in the entire speech production network was modulated by anticipation of overt reading.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Neuroscience Group, Department of Neurology, Brain Imaging Center, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Speech production involves widely distributed brain regions. This MEG study focuses on the spectro-temporal dynamics that contribute to the setup of this network. In 21 participants performing a cue-target reading paradigm, we analyzed local oscillations during preparation for overt and covert reading in the time-frequency domain and localized sources using beamforming. Network dynamics were studied by comparing different dynamic causal models of beta phase coupling in and between hemispheres. While a broadband low frequency effect was found for any task preparation in bilateral prefrontal cortices, preparation for overt speech production was specifically associated with left-lateralized alpha and beta suppression in temporal cortices and beta suppression in motor-related brain regions. Beta phase coupling in the entire speech production network was modulated by anticipation of overt reading. We propose that the processes underlying the setup of the speech production network connect relevant brain regions by means of beta synchronization and prepare the network for left-lateralized information routing by suppression of inhibitory alpha and beta oscillations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency-power-spectrum averaged over anterior and posterior sensors, separately. Normalized power in frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz is plotted against intensity (arbitrary units) separately for baseline (black), preparation for overt (red), and covert reading (blue). For details please see Section “Results.”
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Figure 4: Frequency-power-spectrum averaged over anterior and posterior sensors, separately. Normalized power in frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz is plotted against intensity (arbitrary units) separately for baseline (black), preparation for overt (red), and covert reading (blue). For details please see Section “Results.”

Mentions: The power spectrum revealed an anterior broadband effect (2–15 Hz) that was only masked by the anterior alpha peak (Figure 4). In posterior sensors, alpha and beta oscillations were suppressed for both conditions. Preparation-related effects were sustained in time (Figure 5). However, differences between conditions built up only around 350 ms after cue presentation. Preparation for overt reading was associated with a pronounced alpha and beta suppression. Interestingly, this effect was particularly strong at posterior sensors while anterior sensors did not discriminate as well between conditions (Figure 5).


Setting up the speech production network: how oscillations contribute to lateralized information routing.

Gehrig J, Wibral M, Arnold C, Kell CA - Front Psychol (2012)

Frequency-power-spectrum averaged over anterior and posterior sensors, separately. Normalized power in frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz is plotted against intensity (arbitrary units) separately for baseline (black), preparation for overt (red), and covert reading (blue). For details please see Section “Results.”
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368321&req=5

Figure 4: Frequency-power-spectrum averaged over anterior and posterior sensors, separately. Normalized power in frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz is plotted against intensity (arbitrary units) separately for baseline (black), preparation for overt (red), and covert reading (blue). For details please see Section “Results.”
Mentions: The power spectrum revealed an anterior broadband effect (2–15 Hz) that was only masked by the anterior alpha peak (Figure 4). In posterior sensors, alpha and beta oscillations were suppressed for both conditions. Preparation-related effects were sustained in time (Figure 5). However, differences between conditions built up only around 350 ms after cue presentation. Preparation for overt reading was associated with a pronounced alpha and beta suppression. Interestingly, this effect was particularly strong at posterior sensors while anterior sensors did not discriminate as well between conditions (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: This MEG study focuses on the spectro-temporal dynamics that contribute to the setup of this network.While a broadband low frequency effect was found for any task preparation in bilateral prefrontal cortices, preparation for overt speech production was specifically associated with left-lateralized alpha and beta suppression in temporal cortices and beta suppression in motor-related brain regions.Beta phase coupling in the entire speech production network was modulated by anticipation of overt reading.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Neuroscience Group, Department of Neurology, Brain Imaging Center, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Speech production involves widely distributed brain regions. This MEG study focuses on the spectro-temporal dynamics that contribute to the setup of this network. In 21 participants performing a cue-target reading paradigm, we analyzed local oscillations during preparation for overt and covert reading in the time-frequency domain and localized sources using beamforming. Network dynamics were studied by comparing different dynamic causal models of beta phase coupling in and between hemispheres. While a broadband low frequency effect was found for any task preparation in bilateral prefrontal cortices, preparation for overt speech production was specifically associated with left-lateralized alpha and beta suppression in temporal cortices and beta suppression in motor-related brain regions. Beta phase coupling in the entire speech production network was modulated by anticipation of overt reading. We propose that the processes underlying the setup of the speech production network connect relevant brain regions by means of beta synchronization and prepare the network for left-lateralized information routing by suppression of inhibitory alpha and beta oscillations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus