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Dynamic tissue analysis using time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for atherosclerosis diagnosis.

Sun Y, Sun Y, Stephens D, Xie H, Phipps J, Saroufeem R, Southard J, Elson DS, Marcu L - Opt Express (2011)

Bottom Line: Distinct compositions of excised human atherosclerotic aorta were clearly discriminated over scanning lengths of several centimeters based on fluorescence lifetime and the intensity ratio between 390 and 452 nm.Operation of STWRFS blood flow was further validated in pig femoral arteries in vivo using a single-fiber probe integrated with an ultrasound imaging catheter.Current results demonstrate the potential of STWRFS as a tool for real-time optical characterization of arterial tissue composition and for atherosclerosis research and diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

ABSTRACT
Simultaneous time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (STWRFS) was developed and tested for the dynamic characterization of atherosclerotic tissue ex vivo and arterial vessels in vivo. Autofluorescence, induced by a 337 nm, 700 ps pulsed laser, was split to three wavelength sub-bands using dichroic filters, with each sub-band coupled into a different length of optical fiber for temporal separation. STWRFS allows for fast recording/analysis (few microseconds) of time-resolved fluorescence emission in these sub-bands and rapid scanning. Distinct compositions of excised human atherosclerotic aorta were clearly discriminated over scanning lengths of several centimeters based on fluorescence lifetime and the intensity ratio between 390 and 452 nm. Operation of STWRFS blood flow was further validated in pig femoral arteries in vivo using a single-fiber probe integrated with an ultrasound imaging catheter. Current results demonstrate the potential of STWRFS as a tool for real-time optical characterization of arterial tissue composition and for atherosclerosis research and diagnosis.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Measurement of biomolecules elastin and collagen: (a) fluorescence decay profiles and intensity recorded simultaneously at three wavelengths sub-bands (F1, F2, F3) measured within 200 ns. (b) Spectra of the same elastin and collagen samples excited by 337 nm laser measured with a scanning TR-LIFS device [16] and the corresponding sub-bands for F1(390/40), F2(452/45), and F3(542/50) nm filters.
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g002: Measurement of biomolecules elastin and collagen: (a) fluorescence decay profiles and intensity recorded simultaneously at three wavelengths sub-bands (F1, F2, F3) measured within 200 ns. (b) Spectra of the same elastin and collagen samples excited by 337 nm laser measured with a scanning TR-LIFS device [16] and the corresponding sub-bands for F1(390/40), F2(452/45), and F3(542/50) nm filters.

Mentions: STWRFS system with a single optical fiber as a probe for excitation delivery and fluorescence collection. (a) System diagram including optical design and electronic configuration. (b) Photograph of the portable optical setup using microscope cubes and micro-lenses.


Dynamic tissue analysis using time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for atherosclerosis diagnosis.

Sun Y, Sun Y, Stephens D, Xie H, Phipps J, Saroufeem R, Southard J, Elson DS, Marcu L - Opt Express (2011)

Measurement of biomolecules elastin and collagen: (a) fluorescence decay profiles and intensity recorded simultaneously at three wavelengths sub-bands (F1, F2, F3) measured within 200 ns. (b) Spectra of the same elastin and collagen samples excited by 337 nm laser measured with a scanning TR-LIFS device [16] and the corresponding sub-bands for F1(390/40), F2(452/45), and F3(542/50) nm filters.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368314&req=5

g002: Measurement of biomolecules elastin and collagen: (a) fluorescence decay profiles and intensity recorded simultaneously at three wavelengths sub-bands (F1, F2, F3) measured within 200 ns. (b) Spectra of the same elastin and collagen samples excited by 337 nm laser measured with a scanning TR-LIFS device [16] and the corresponding sub-bands for F1(390/40), F2(452/45), and F3(542/50) nm filters.
Mentions: STWRFS system with a single optical fiber as a probe for excitation delivery and fluorescence collection. (a) System diagram including optical design and electronic configuration. (b) Photograph of the portable optical setup using microscope cubes and micro-lenses.

Bottom Line: Distinct compositions of excised human atherosclerotic aorta were clearly discriminated over scanning lengths of several centimeters based on fluorescence lifetime and the intensity ratio between 390 and 452 nm.Operation of STWRFS blood flow was further validated in pig femoral arteries in vivo using a single-fiber probe integrated with an ultrasound imaging catheter.Current results demonstrate the potential of STWRFS as a tool for real-time optical characterization of arterial tissue composition and for atherosclerosis research and diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

ABSTRACT
Simultaneous time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (STWRFS) was developed and tested for the dynamic characterization of atherosclerotic tissue ex vivo and arterial vessels in vivo. Autofluorescence, induced by a 337 nm, 700 ps pulsed laser, was split to three wavelength sub-bands using dichroic filters, with each sub-band coupled into a different length of optical fiber for temporal separation. STWRFS allows for fast recording/analysis (few microseconds) of time-resolved fluorescence emission in these sub-bands and rapid scanning. Distinct compositions of excised human atherosclerotic aorta were clearly discriminated over scanning lengths of several centimeters based on fluorescence lifetime and the intensity ratio between 390 and 452 nm. Operation of STWRFS blood flow was further validated in pig femoral arteries in vivo using a single-fiber probe integrated with an ultrasound imaging catheter. Current results demonstrate the potential of STWRFS as a tool for real-time optical characterization of arterial tissue composition and for atherosclerosis research and diagnosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus