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Imaging beyond the ballistic limit in coherence imaging using multiply scattered light.

Giacomelli MG, Wax A - Opt Express (2011)

Bottom Line: We present an imaging system based on low coherence interferometric detection of multiply scattered light for extended depth imaging into highly scattering media.By incorporating angle-resolved detection, coherence imaging with multiply scattered photons is shown to be both feasible and potentially superior to existing techniques for performing time-resolved measurements of scattered light.The resolution and imaging contrast are compared to those obtained with conventional OCT systems which chiefly detect singly scattered light.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering and Fitzpatrick Center for Photonics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

ABSTRACT
We present an imaging system based on low coherence interferometric detection of multiply scattered light for extended depth imaging into highly scattering media. By incorporating angle-resolved detection, coherence imaging with multiply scattered photons is shown to be both feasible and potentially superior to existing techniques for performing time-resolved measurements of scattered light. Imaging is demonstrated through nearly 100 mean free paths of scattering phantom in a single-ended geometry. The resolution and imaging contrast are compared to those obtained with conventional OCT systems which chiefly detect singly scattered light.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the time domain MS/LCI system. a) 830 nm Ti:Saphire light is divided into sample (blue) and reference (red) arm paths. A pair of acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) frequency shift the sample and reference arms such that a 10MHz frequency offset exists between them. Mirror M1 adjusts the illumination angle onto the sample, while lens L3 (f = 100 mm) adjusts the collection angle. A retro-reflecting prism (RR) is used to perform depth scans, while B scans are performed by translating the entire sample enclosure. L1 (f = 35 mm) and L2 (f = 100 mm) form a 4f relay onto the center of L4 which can be translated to adjust the collection angle. b) Close up of the sample chamber. A 4 mm gold coated reflector is suspended in the middle of a 2x2 cm box filled with scattering media.
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g001: Schematic of the time domain MS/LCI system. a) 830 nm Ti:Saphire light is divided into sample (blue) and reference (red) arm paths. A pair of acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) frequency shift the sample and reference arms such that a 10MHz frequency offset exists between them. Mirror M1 adjusts the illumination angle onto the sample, while lens L3 (f = 100 mm) adjusts the collection angle. A retro-reflecting prism (RR) is used to perform depth scans, while B scans are performed by translating the entire sample enclosure. L1 (f = 35 mm) and L2 (f = 100 mm) form a 4f relay onto the center of L4 which can be translated to adjust the collection angle. b) Close up of the sample chamber. A 4 mm gold coated reflector is suspended in the middle of a 2x2 cm box filled with scattering media.

Mentions: In the experimental system [Fig. 1(a)Fig. 1


Imaging beyond the ballistic limit in coherence imaging using multiply scattered light.

Giacomelli MG, Wax A - Opt Express (2011)

Schematic of the time domain MS/LCI system. a) 830 nm Ti:Saphire light is divided into sample (blue) and reference (red) arm paths. A pair of acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) frequency shift the sample and reference arms such that a 10MHz frequency offset exists between them. Mirror M1 adjusts the illumination angle onto the sample, while lens L3 (f = 100 mm) adjusts the collection angle. A retro-reflecting prism (RR) is used to perform depth scans, while B scans are performed by translating the entire sample enclosure. L1 (f = 35 mm) and L2 (f = 100 mm) form a 4f relay onto the center of L4 which can be translated to adjust the collection angle. b) Close up of the sample chamber. A 4 mm gold coated reflector is suspended in the middle of a 2x2 cm box filled with scattering media.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3368313&req=5

g001: Schematic of the time domain MS/LCI system. a) 830 nm Ti:Saphire light is divided into sample (blue) and reference (red) arm paths. A pair of acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) frequency shift the sample and reference arms such that a 10MHz frequency offset exists between them. Mirror M1 adjusts the illumination angle onto the sample, while lens L3 (f = 100 mm) adjusts the collection angle. A retro-reflecting prism (RR) is used to perform depth scans, while B scans are performed by translating the entire sample enclosure. L1 (f = 35 mm) and L2 (f = 100 mm) form a 4f relay onto the center of L4 which can be translated to adjust the collection angle. b) Close up of the sample chamber. A 4 mm gold coated reflector is suspended in the middle of a 2x2 cm box filled with scattering media.
Mentions: In the experimental system [Fig. 1(a)Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We present an imaging system based on low coherence interferometric detection of multiply scattered light for extended depth imaging into highly scattering media.By incorporating angle-resolved detection, coherence imaging with multiply scattered photons is shown to be both feasible and potentially superior to existing techniques for performing time-resolved measurements of scattered light.The resolution and imaging contrast are compared to those obtained with conventional OCT systems which chiefly detect singly scattered light.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering and Fitzpatrick Center for Photonics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

ABSTRACT
We present an imaging system based on low coherence interferometric detection of multiply scattered light for extended depth imaging into highly scattering media. By incorporating angle-resolved detection, coherence imaging with multiply scattered photons is shown to be both feasible and potentially superior to existing techniques for performing time-resolved measurements of scattered light. Imaging is demonstrated through nearly 100 mean free paths of scattering phantom in a single-ended geometry. The resolution and imaging contrast are compared to those obtained with conventional OCT systems which chiefly detect singly scattered light.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus