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Effects of acute tryptophan depletion on prefrontal-amygdala connectivity while viewing facial signals of aggression.

Passamonti L, Crockett MJ, Apergis-Schoute AM, Clark L, Rowe JB, Calder AJ, Robbins TW - Biol. Psychiatry (2011)

Bottom Line: However, whether lowering 5-HT alters the dynamic interplay between the PFC and the amygdala has not been directly tested in humans.Data from 19 subjects were available for the final analyses.We provide strong support for neurobiological accounts positing that 5-HT significantly influences PFC-amygdala circuits implicated in aggression and other affective behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unità di Ricerca Neuroimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Catanzaro, Italy. l.passamonti@isn.cnr.it

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Preferred model during placebo. The amygdala (AMY) is the only region where driving inputs (all faces vs. fixation, black “thick” arrows) start the “perturbation” of the network. In this model, the contextual modulator (angry vs. neutral faces, red arrows) influences all neural pathways linking the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), and AMY. The intrinsic connectivity (black “thin” arrows) represents the couplings between regions irrespective of any experimental manipulation and are modeled as reciprocal connections between all three regions. (B, C) Expected probability and (E and F) exceedance probability for all 49 models shown in Supplement 1 Figures S1–S3 using random-effects (RFX) Bayesian model selection during placebo and acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). Compared with placebo, under ATD, model C1.1 has lower expected and exceedance probabilities; at the same time, model C2.1 and C3.1 (D) became more likely. These latter models are characterized by a smaller number of contextual modulators (affecting two or one couples of specific pathways) compared with model C1.1 where contextual modulators affect all possible pathways.
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fig3: (A) Preferred model during placebo. The amygdala (AMY) is the only region where driving inputs (all faces vs. fixation, black “thick” arrows) start the “perturbation” of the network. In this model, the contextual modulator (angry vs. neutral faces, red arrows) influences all neural pathways linking the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), and AMY. The intrinsic connectivity (black “thin” arrows) represents the couplings between regions irrespective of any experimental manipulation and are modeled as reciprocal connections between all three regions. (B, C) Expected probability and (E and F) exceedance probability for all 49 models shown in Supplement 1 Figures S1–S3 using random-effects (RFX) Bayesian model selection during placebo and acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). Compared with placebo, under ATD, model C1.1 has lower expected and exceedance probabilities; at the same time, model C2.1 and C3.1 (D) became more likely. These latter models are characterized by a smaller number of contextual modulators (affecting two or one couples of specific pathways) compared with model C1.1 where contextual modulators affect all possible pathways.

Mentions: For placebo, RFX-BMS indicated evidence favoring model C1.1 (Figure 3B–E). In this family (Figure 3A), driving inputs (all faces) entered the system via the amygdala alone, whereas the angry vs. neutral modulator affected bidirectional connections in all three pathways. Hence, during placebo, the effect of the task is distributed within internal PFC circuitry and across PFC–amygdala connections.


Effects of acute tryptophan depletion on prefrontal-amygdala connectivity while viewing facial signals of aggression.

Passamonti L, Crockett MJ, Apergis-Schoute AM, Clark L, Rowe JB, Calder AJ, Robbins TW - Biol. Psychiatry (2011)

(A) Preferred model during placebo. The amygdala (AMY) is the only region where driving inputs (all faces vs. fixation, black “thick” arrows) start the “perturbation” of the network. In this model, the contextual modulator (angry vs. neutral faces, red arrows) influences all neural pathways linking the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), and AMY. The intrinsic connectivity (black “thin” arrows) represents the couplings between regions irrespective of any experimental manipulation and are modeled as reciprocal connections between all three regions. (B, C) Expected probability and (E and F) exceedance probability for all 49 models shown in Supplement 1 Figures S1–S3 using random-effects (RFX) Bayesian model selection during placebo and acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). Compared with placebo, under ATD, model C1.1 has lower expected and exceedance probabilities; at the same time, model C2.1 and C3.1 (D) became more likely. These latter models are characterized by a smaller number of contextual modulators (affecting two or one couples of specific pathways) compared with model C1.1 where contextual modulators affect all possible pathways.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig3: (A) Preferred model during placebo. The amygdala (AMY) is the only region where driving inputs (all faces vs. fixation, black “thick” arrows) start the “perturbation” of the network. In this model, the contextual modulator (angry vs. neutral faces, red arrows) influences all neural pathways linking the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), and AMY. The intrinsic connectivity (black “thin” arrows) represents the couplings between regions irrespective of any experimental manipulation and are modeled as reciprocal connections between all three regions. (B, C) Expected probability and (E and F) exceedance probability for all 49 models shown in Supplement 1 Figures S1–S3 using random-effects (RFX) Bayesian model selection during placebo and acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). Compared with placebo, under ATD, model C1.1 has lower expected and exceedance probabilities; at the same time, model C2.1 and C3.1 (D) became more likely. These latter models are characterized by a smaller number of contextual modulators (affecting two or one couples of specific pathways) compared with model C1.1 where contextual modulators affect all possible pathways.
Mentions: For placebo, RFX-BMS indicated evidence favoring model C1.1 (Figure 3B–E). In this family (Figure 3A), driving inputs (all faces) entered the system via the amygdala alone, whereas the angry vs. neutral modulator affected bidirectional connections in all three pathways. Hence, during placebo, the effect of the task is distributed within internal PFC circuitry and across PFC–amygdala connections.

Bottom Line: However, whether lowering 5-HT alters the dynamic interplay between the PFC and the amygdala has not been directly tested in humans.Data from 19 subjects were available for the final analyses.We provide strong support for neurobiological accounts positing that 5-HT significantly influences PFC-amygdala circuits implicated in aggression and other affective behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unità di Ricerca Neuroimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Catanzaro, Italy. l.passamonti@isn.cnr.it

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus